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Mapping track density changes in nigrostriatal and extranigral pathways in Parkinson's disease.

Ziegler E, Rouillard M, André E, Coolen T, Stender J, Balteau E, Phillips C, Garraux G - Neuroimage (2014)

Bottom Line: Twenty-seven non-demented Parkinson's patients (mean disease duration: 5 years, mean score on the Hoehn & Yahr scale=1.5) were compared with 26 elderly controls matched for age, sex, and education level.Statistically significant increases in track density were found in the Parkinson's patients, relative to controls.The results identified in brainstem and nigrostriatal pathways show a large overlap with the known distribution of neuropathological changes in non-demented PD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of the increases in track density. Group-level statistical map of increased streamline density throughout the brain. Clusters are overlaid on the group-mean magnetization transfer image. MNI coordinates in millimeters are displayed on top of each slice. Clusters shown in blue are significant at pFWE < 0.05 and those in red are significant below pFWE < 0.01, estimated with threshold-free cluster enhancement.
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f0005: Overview of the increases in track density. Group-level statistical map of increased streamline density throughout the brain. Clusters are overlaid on the group-mean magnetization transfer image. MNI coordinates in millimeters are displayed on top of each slice. Clusters shown in blue are significant at pFWE < 0.05 and those in red are significant below pFWE < 0.01, estimated with threshold-free cluster enhancement.

Mentions: Statistically significant increases in track density in Parkinson's disease, relative to controls, were found in brainstem and extrapyramidal motor networks, limbic, and cognitive circuits. Areas of increased TDI were strikingly symmetric between hemispheres. Fig. 1 shows axial slices of the population mean MT image, with the clusters containing significantly increased TDI overlaid. There were no statistically significant decreases in track density in the Parkinson's patients, compared to controls. To clarify the widely distributed but significant results, we lowered the statistical threshold to 0.01 (family-wise error rate corrected). The percent signal change in PD for clusters significant at pFWE < 0.01 is documented in Table 2.


Mapping track density changes in nigrostriatal and extranigral pathways in Parkinson's disease.

Ziegler E, Rouillard M, André E, Coolen T, Stender J, Balteau E, Phillips C, Garraux G - Neuroimage (2014)

Overview of the increases in track density. Group-level statistical map of increased streamline density throughout the brain. Clusters are overlaid on the group-mean magnetization transfer image. MNI coordinates in millimeters are displayed on top of each slice. Clusters shown in blue are significant at pFWE < 0.05 and those in red are significant below pFWE < 0.01, estimated with threshold-free cluster enhancement.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4121087&req=5

f0005: Overview of the increases in track density. Group-level statistical map of increased streamline density throughout the brain. Clusters are overlaid on the group-mean magnetization transfer image. MNI coordinates in millimeters are displayed on top of each slice. Clusters shown in blue are significant at pFWE < 0.05 and those in red are significant below pFWE < 0.01, estimated with threshold-free cluster enhancement.
Mentions: Statistically significant increases in track density in Parkinson's disease, relative to controls, were found in brainstem and extrapyramidal motor networks, limbic, and cognitive circuits. Areas of increased TDI were strikingly symmetric between hemispheres. Fig. 1 shows axial slices of the population mean MT image, with the clusters containing significantly increased TDI overlaid. There were no statistically significant decreases in track density in the Parkinson's patients, compared to controls. To clarify the widely distributed but significant results, we lowered the statistical threshold to 0.01 (family-wise error rate corrected). The percent signal change in PD for clusters significant at pFWE < 0.01 is documented in Table 2.

Bottom Line: Twenty-seven non-demented Parkinson's patients (mean disease duration: 5 years, mean score on the Hoehn & Yahr scale=1.5) were compared with 26 elderly controls matched for age, sex, and education level.Statistically significant increases in track density were found in the Parkinson's patients, relative to controls.The results identified in brainstem and nigrostriatal pathways show a large overlap with the known distribution of neuropathological changes in non-demented PD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus