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Nickel Ion Release from Three Types of Nickel-titanium-based Orthodontic Archwires in the As-received State and After Oral Simulation.

Ramazanzadeh BA, Ahrari F, Sabzevari B, Habibi S - J Dent Res Dent Clin Dent Prospects (2014)

Bottom Line: Results.The quantity of nickelion released from Damon Copper NiTi was the lowest in both conditions.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Background and aims. This study aimed to investigate release of nickel ion from three types of nickel-titanium-based wires in the as-received state and after immersion in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. Forty specimens from each of the single-strand NiTi (Rematitan "Lite"), multi-strand NiTi (SPEED Supercable) and Copper NiTi (Damon Copper NiTi) were selected. Twenty specimens from each type were used in the as-received state and the others were kept in deflected state at 37ºC for 2 months followed by autoclave sterilization. The as-received and recycled wire specimens were immersed in glass bottles containing 1.8 mL of artificial saliva for 28 days and the amount of nickel ion released into the electrolyte was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results. The single-strand NiTi released the highest quantity of nickel ion in the as-received state and the multi-strand NiTi showed the highest ion release after oral simulation. The quantity of nickelion released from Damon Copper NiTi was the lowest in both conditions. Oral simulation followed by sterilization did not have a significant influence on nickel ion release from multi-strand NiTi and Damon Copper NiTi wires, but single-strand NiTi released statistically lower quantities of nickel ion after oral simulation. Conclusion. The multi-strand nature of Supercable did not enhance the potential of corrosion after immersion in the simulated oral environment. In vitro use of nickel-titanium-based archwires followed by sterilization did not significantly increase the amount of nickel ion released from these wires.

No MeSH data available.


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Mentions: For oral simulation, acrylic plates were used on each 3-mm step designed to represent moderate crowding in the anterior segment of the maxillary dentition. Ten rows of brackets were bonded to each acrylic model using self-curing acrylic resin.Figure 1 Each row contained three standard edgewise upper central incisor brackets of 0.018-inch slot size (Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany), which were positioned at the same line with their long axis parallel. The wire specimens were held on the brackets by using elastomeric ligatures (Ortho Technology, Tampa, Florida, USA). The acrylic models were placed in plastic containers filled with Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva solution and kept in a 37°C incubator for 2 months. The artificial saliva with a pH value of 7.03 consisted of KCl (0.4 g/L), NaCl (0.4 g/L), CaCl2.2H2O (0.906 g/L), NaH2PO4.2H2O (0.690 g/L), Na2S.9H2O (0.005 g/L) and Urea (1 g/L).22 At the end of the 2-month incubation, the specimens were retrieved from the solution, washed and dried. The wires were then subjected to a thermocycling process for 500 cycles, using 5° and 55°C temperatures with a dwell time of 30 seconds per bath. Finally, the specimens were sterilized in an autoclave at 121°C (250°F) and 15 to 20 psi for 20 minutes.


Nickel Ion Release from Three Types of Nickel-titanium-based Orthodontic Archwires in the As-received State and After Oral Simulation.

Ramazanzadeh BA, Ahrari F, Sabzevari B, Habibi S - J Dent Res Dent Clin Dent Prospects (2014)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120908&req=5

Mentions: For oral simulation, acrylic plates were used on each 3-mm step designed to represent moderate crowding in the anterior segment of the maxillary dentition. Ten rows of brackets were bonded to each acrylic model using self-curing acrylic resin.Figure 1 Each row contained three standard edgewise upper central incisor brackets of 0.018-inch slot size (Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany), which were positioned at the same line with their long axis parallel. The wire specimens were held on the brackets by using elastomeric ligatures (Ortho Technology, Tampa, Florida, USA). The acrylic models were placed in plastic containers filled with Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva solution and kept in a 37°C incubator for 2 months. The artificial saliva with a pH value of 7.03 consisted of KCl (0.4 g/L), NaCl (0.4 g/L), CaCl2.2H2O (0.906 g/L), NaH2PO4.2H2O (0.690 g/L), Na2S.9H2O (0.005 g/L) and Urea (1 g/L).22 At the end of the 2-month incubation, the specimens were retrieved from the solution, washed and dried. The wires were then subjected to a thermocycling process for 500 cycles, using 5° and 55°C temperatures with a dwell time of 30 seconds per bath. Finally, the specimens were sterilized in an autoclave at 121°C (250°F) and 15 to 20 psi for 20 minutes.

Bottom Line: Results.The quantity of nickelion released from Damon Copper NiTi was the lowest in both conditions.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Background and aims. This study aimed to investigate release of nickel ion from three types of nickel-titanium-based wires in the as-received state and after immersion in a simulated oral environment. Materials and methods. Forty specimens from each of the single-strand NiTi (Rematitan "Lite"), multi-strand NiTi (SPEED Supercable) and Copper NiTi (Damon Copper NiTi) were selected. Twenty specimens from each type were used in the as-received state and the others were kept in deflected state at 37ºC for 2 months followed by autoclave sterilization. The as-received and recycled wire specimens were immersed in glass bottles containing 1.8 mL of artificial saliva for 28 days and the amount of nickel ion released into the electrolyte was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results. The single-strand NiTi released the highest quantity of nickel ion in the as-received state and the multi-strand NiTi showed the highest ion release after oral simulation. The quantity of nickelion released from Damon Copper NiTi was the lowest in both conditions. Oral simulation followed by sterilization did not have a significant influence on nickel ion release from multi-strand NiTi and Damon Copper NiTi wires, but single-strand NiTi released statistically lower quantities of nickel ion after oral simulation. Conclusion. The multi-strand nature of Supercable did not enhance the potential of corrosion after immersion in the simulated oral environment. In vitro use of nickel-titanium-based archwires followed by sterilization did not significantly increase the amount of nickel ion released from these wires.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus