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Subphrenic abscess as a complication of hemodialysis catheter-related infection.

Caravaca F, Burguera V, Fernández-Lucas M, Teruel JL, Quereda C - Case Rep Nephrol (2014)

Bottom Line: We describe an unusual case of subphrenic abscess complicating a central venous catheter infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a 59-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis.A transesophageal echocardiography showed a large tubular thrombus in superior vena cava, extending to the right atrium, but no evidence of endocarditis or other metastatic infectious foci.Catheter removal, percutaneous abscess drainage, anticoagulation, and antibiotics resulted in a favourable outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, 28034 Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We describe an unusual case of subphrenic abscess complicating a central venous catheter infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a 59-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis. The diagnosis was made through computed tomography, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the purulent drainage of the subphrenic abscess, the catheter tip and exit site, and the blood culture samples. A transesophageal echocardiography showed a large tubular thrombus in superior vena cava, extending to the right atrium, but no evidence of endocarditis or other metastatic infectious foci. Catheter removal, percutaneous abscess drainage, anticoagulation, and antibiotics resulted in a favourable outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed tomography showing a complete healing of the subphrenic abscess (arrow); aorta (Ao); liver (L); spleen (Sp); stomach (St).
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fig4: Computed tomography showing a complete healing of the subphrenic abscess (arrow); aorta (Ao); liver (L); spleen (Sp); stomach (St).

Mentions: According to sensitivity pattern, the patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin, intravenous tobramycin, and anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin. The clinical course was favourable, the fever disappeared, and her condition improved rapidly. A transesophageal echocardiogram performed four weeks after admission revealed no thrombus, and another computed tomography confirmed the complete healing of the subphrenic abscess (Figure 4).


Subphrenic abscess as a complication of hemodialysis catheter-related infection.

Caravaca F, Burguera V, Fernández-Lucas M, Teruel JL, Quereda C - Case Rep Nephrol (2014)

Computed tomography showing a complete healing of the subphrenic abscess (arrow); aorta (Ao); liver (L); spleen (Sp); stomach (St).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120791&req=5

fig4: Computed tomography showing a complete healing of the subphrenic abscess (arrow); aorta (Ao); liver (L); spleen (Sp); stomach (St).
Mentions: According to sensitivity pattern, the patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin, intravenous tobramycin, and anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin. The clinical course was favourable, the fever disappeared, and her condition improved rapidly. A transesophageal echocardiogram performed four weeks after admission revealed no thrombus, and another computed tomography confirmed the complete healing of the subphrenic abscess (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: We describe an unusual case of subphrenic abscess complicating a central venous catheter infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a 59-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis.A transesophageal echocardiography showed a large tubular thrombus in superior vena cava, extending to the right atrium, but no evidence of endocarditis or other metastatic infectious foci.Catheter removal, percutaneous abscess drainage, anticoagulation, and antibiotics resulted in a favourable outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, 28034 Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We describe an unusual case of subphrenic abscess complicating a central venous catheter infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a 59-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis. The diagnosis was made through computed tomography, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the purulent drainage of the subphrenic abscess, the catheter tip and exit site, and the blood culture samples. A transesophageal echocardiography showed a large tubular thrombus in superior vena cava, extending to the right atrium, but no evidence of endocarditis or other metastatic infectious foci. Catheter removal, percutaneous abscess drainage, anticoagulation, and antibiotics resulted in a favourable outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus