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Devaluation and sequential decisions: linking goal-directed and model-based behavior.

Friedel E, Koch SP, Wendt J, Heinz A, Deserno L, Schlagenhauf F - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: More recently sequential decision-making tasks have been designed to assess the degree of goal-directed vs. habitual choice behavior in terms of an influential computational theory of model-based compared to model-free behavioral control.Correlational analysis revealed a positive association between model-based choices during sequential decisions and goal-directed behavior after devaluation suggesting a single framework underlying both operationalizations and speaking in favor of construct validity of both measurement approaches.Up to now, this has been merely assumed but never been directly tested in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In experimental psychology different experiments have been developed to assess goal-directed as compared to habitual control over instrumental decisions. Similar to animal studies selective devaluation procedures have been used. More recently sequential decision-making tasks have been designed to assess the degree of goal-directed vs. habitual choice behavior in terms of an influential computational theory of model-based compared to model-free behavioral control. As recently suggested, different measurements are thought to reflect the same construct. Yet, there has been no attempt to directly assess the construct validity of these different measurements. In the present study, we used a devaluation paradigm and a sequential decision-making task to address this question of construct validity in a sample of 18 healthy male human participants. Correlational analysis revealed a positive association between model-based choices during sequential decisions and goal-directed behavior after devaluation suggesting a single framework underlying both operationalizations and speaking in favor of construct validity of both measurement approaches. Up to now, this has been merely assumed but never been directly tested in humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subjective pleasantness ratings for the devalued (chocolate or tomato), the neutral (water), and the common (fruit tea) outcome at 4 time points throughout the experimental procedure. After devaluation, participants rated the devalued food (chocolate or tomato) significantly (as indicated by *) less pleasant compared to the valued and neutral condition (T = 2.67, p = 0.019). Further, they reported significantly less hunger after the devaluation procedure (panels display subjective hunger ratings at the 4 time points, T = 2.25, p = 0.042).
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Figure 4: Subjective pleasantness ratings for the devalued (chocolate or tomato), the neutral (water), and the common (fruit tea) outcome at 4 time points throughout the experimental procedure. After devaluation, participants rated the devalued food (chocolate or tomato) significantly (as indicated by *) less pleasant compared to the valued and neutral condition (T = 2.67, p = 0.019). Further, they reported significantly less hunger after the devaluation procedure (panels display subjective hunger ratings at the 4 time points, T = 2.25, p = 0.042).

Mentions: After devaluation, participants rated the devalued food (chocolate or tomato) significantly less pleasant compared to the valued and neutral condition (Figure 4, T = 2.67, p = 0.019). Further, they reported significantly less hunger after the devaluation procedure (Figure 4, T = 2.25, p = 0.042). These results clearly indicate that the devaluation exerted its expected effect selectively for the devalued but not for the valued outcome.


Devaluation and sequential decisions: linking goal-directed and model-based behavior.

Friedel E, Koch SP, Wendt J, Heinz A, Deserno L, Schlagenhauf F - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Subjective pleasantness ratings for the devalued (chocolate or tomato), the neutral (water), and the common (fruit tea) outcome at 4 time points throughout the experimental procedure. After devaluation, participants rated the devalued food (chocolate or tomato) significantly (as indicated by *) less pleasant compared to the valued and neutral condition (T = 2.67, p = 0.019). Further, they reported significantly less hunger after the devaluation procedure (panels display subjective hunger ratings at the 4 time points, T = 2.25, p = 0.042).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120761&req=5

Figure 4: Subjective pleasantness ratings for the devalued (chocolate or tomato), the neutral (water), and the common (fruit tea) outcome at 4 time points throughout the experimental procedure. After devaluation, participants rated the devalued food (chocolate or tomato) significantly (as indicated by *) less pleasant compared to the valued and neutral condition (T = 2.67, p = 0.019). Further, they reported significantly less hunger after the devaluation procedure (panels display subjective hunger ratings at the 4 time points, T = 2.25, p = 0.042).
Mentions: After devaluation, participants rated the devalued food (chocolate or tomato) significantly less pleasant compared to the valued and neutral condition (Figure 4, T = 2.67, p = 0.019). Further, they reported significantly less hunger after the devaluation procedure (Figure 4, T = 2.25, p = 0.042). These results clearly indicate that the devaluation exerted its expected effect selectively for the devalued but not for the valued outcome.

Bottom Line: More recently sequential decision-making tasks have been designed to assess the degree of goal-directed vs. habitual choice behavior in terms of an influential computational theory of model-based compared to model-free behavioral control.Correlational analysis revealed a positive association between model-based choices during sequential decisions and goal-directed behavior after devaluation suggesting a single framework underlying both operationalizations and speaking in favor of construct validity of both measurement approaches.Up to now, this has been merely assumed but never been directly tested in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In experimental psychology different experiments have been developed to assess goal-directed as compared to habitual control over instrumental decisions. Similar to animal studies selective devaluation procedures have been used. More recently sequential decision-making tasks have been designed to assess the degree of goal-directed vs. habitual choice behavior in terms of an influential computational theory of model-based compared to model-free behavioral control. As recently suggested, different measurements are thought to reflect the same construct. Yet, there has been no attempt to directly assess the construct validity of these different measurements. In the present study, we used a devaluation paradigm and a sequential decision-making task to address this question of construct validity in a sample of 18 healthy male human participants. Correlational analysis revealed a positive association between model-based choices during sequential decisions and goal-directed behavior after devaluation suggesting a single framework underlying both operationalizations and speaking in favor of construct validity of both measurement approaches. Up to now, this has been merely assumed but never been directly tested in humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus