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Cutaneous Metastases from Primary Hepatobiliary Tumors as the First Sign of Tumor Recurrence following Liver Transplantation.

Hauch AT, Buell JF, McGowan M, Bhatia P, Lewin E, Killackey M, Shores NJ, Balart LA, Moehlen M, Saggi B, Paramesh AS - Case Rep Transplant (2014)

Bottom Line: Cutaneous metastasis from hepatobiliary tumors is a rare event, especially following liver transplantation.We report our experience with two cases of cutaneous metastases from both hepatocellular carcinoma and mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocarcinoma following liver transplantation, along with a review of the literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tulane Transplant Institute, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1415 Tulane Avenue, HC-5, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cutaneous metastasis from hepatobiliary tumors is a rare event, especially following liver transplantation. We report our experience with two cases of cutaneous metastases from both hepatocellular carcinoma and mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocarcinoma following liver transplantation, along with a review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Illustration demonstrating locations of cutaneous metastases for patients of Case  1 and Case  2. (b and c) Multiple erythematous-violaceous metastatic lesions with irregular borders representing mixed HCC/cholangiocarcinoma found at the previous incision site of the patient in Case  2.
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fig1: (a) Illustration demonstrating locations of cutaneous metastases for patients of Case  1 and Case  2. (b and c) Multiple erythematous-violaceous metastatic lesions with irregular borders representing mixed HCC/cholangiocarcinoma found at the previous incision site of the patient in Case  2.

Mentions: The patient initially had good liver function but developed recurrent HCV liver disease about one year after transplant and was initiated on antiviral therapy with an interferon, ribavirin, and boceprevir protocol. In December 2013 the patient developed several violaceous, painful, firm, immobile skin lesions on his right anterior chest wall, several inches from his transplant incision (Figure 1(a)). These lesions were biopsied and demonstrated subcutaneous metastatic well-differentiated HCC (Figure 2(a)). Immunohistochemical staining was positive for HepPar-1 (Figure 2(b)). Interestingly, imaging did not reveal any evidence of intrahepatic or pulmonary HCC recurrence. The patient had undergone a percutaneous biopsy of his HCC pretransplant, but this had been done in October of 2010, more than three years earlier. His alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels were never elevated.


Cutaneous Metastases from Primary Hepatobiliary Tumors as the First Sign of Tumor Recurrence following Liver Transplantation.

Hauch AT, Buell JF, McGowan M, Bhatia P, Lewin E, Killackey M, Shores NJ, Balart LA, Moehlen M, Saggi B, Paramesh AS - Case Rep Transplant (2014)

(a) Illustration demonstrating locations of cutaneous metastases for patients of Case  1 and Case  2. (b and c) Multiple erythematous-violaceous metastatic lesions with irregular borders representing mixed HCC/cholangiocarcinoma found at the previous incision site of the patient in Case  2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120480&req=5

fig1: (a) Illustration demonstrating locations of cutaneous metastases for patients of Case  1 and Case  2. (b and c) Multiple erythematous-violaceous metastatic lesions with irregular borders representing mixed HCC/cholangiocarcinoma found at the previous incision site of the patient in Case  2.
Mentions: The patient initially had good liver function but developed recurrent HCV liver disease about one year after transplant and was initiated on antiviral therapy with an interferon, ribavirin, and boceprevir protocol. In December 2013 the patient developed several violaceous, painful, firm, immobile skin lesions on his right anterior chest wall, several inches from his transplant incision (Figure 1(a)). These lesions were biopsied and demonstrated subcutaneous metastatic well-differentiated HCC (Figure 2(a)). Immunohistochemical staining was positive for HepPar-1 (Figure 2(b)). Interestingly, imaging did not reveal any evidence of intrahepatic or pulmonary HCC recurrence. The patient had undergone a percutaneous biopsy of his HCC pretransplant, but this had been done in October of 2010, more than three years earlier. His alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels were never elevated.

Bottom Line: Cutaneous metastasis from hepatobiliary tumors is a rare event, especially following liver transplantation.We report our experience with two cases of cutaneous metastases from both hepatocellular carcinoma and mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocarcinoma following liver transplantation, along with a review of the literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tulane Transplant Institute, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1415 Tulane Avenue, HC-5, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cutaneous metastasis from hepatobiliary tumors is a rare event, especially following liver transplantation. We report our experience with two cases of cutaneous metastases from both hepatocellular carcinoma and mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocarcinoma following liver transplantation, along with a review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus