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Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model.

Qian JG, Li Z, Zhang H, Bian R, Zhang S - J Hum Kinet (2014)

Bottom Line: The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc.The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures.Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport Science, Nanjing Sport Institute, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Joint reaction forces of five tested fitness movements. The three vertical lines on the curves represent three critical times, early, mid and late stages of a) walking, b) squat, c) one-leg standing, d) forward lunge, and e) lateral lunge.
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f3-jhk-41-59: Joint reaction forces of five tested fitness movements. The three vertical lines on the curves represent three critical times, early, mid and late stages of a) walking, b) squat, c) one-leg standing, d) forward lunge, and e) lateral lunge.

Mentions: The hip JRFs from LifeMod were analyzed at the three different times, at early (loading response), mid (mid-stance), and late stance (swing leg heel-strike), which represent maximum and minimum loading during level walking (Figure 3a). The results showed that the peak hip compressive force reached over 650 N and 390 N in the early and late stance (Table 1). Figure 3b shows the hip JRF patterns in the squat with the three vertical lines representing early (maximum knee flexion), mid (mid extension), and late stance (erect position). The compressive JRF in ANSYS showed smaller loading in the early and mid-stance, and higher loading in the late stance (Table 1). Figure 3c shows the hip JRF patterns of LifeMod in the one-leg standing with the 3 lines representing the early (swing leg leaving ground), mid (mid swing) and late stance (swing leg reaching highest point). The ANSYS compressive hip JRF reached similar levels of loading at the three different critical times (Table 1). The hip JRFs in LifeMod were provided in Figure 3d with values analyzed at early (touchdown of front leg), mid (lowest point of center of gravity (COG)), and late stance (trailing leg off ground). The compressive JRF in ANSYS was higher in the early and mid- stance while the shear JRF was highest in the late stance and lowest in the mid stance (Table 1). Figure 3e shows the JRF patterns of the lateral lunge with the 3 lines representing the early (leading leg touchdown), mid (lowest COG position), and late stance (contralateral leg off ground). The ANSYS compressive and shear forces were highest in late stance in the movement (Table 1).


Effectiveness of Selected Fitness Exercises on Stress of Femoral Neck using Musculoskeletal Dynamics Simulations and Finite Element Model.

Qian JG, Li Z, Zhang H, Bian R, Zhang S - J Hum Kinet (2014)

Joint reaction forces of five tested fitness movements. The three vertical lines on the curves represent three critical times, early, mid and late stages of a) walking, b) squat, c) one-leg standing, d) forward lunge, and e) lateral lunge.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120465&req=5

f3-jhk-41-59: Joint reaction forces of five tested fitness movements. The three vertical lines on the curves represent three critical times, early, mid and late stages of a) walking, b) squat, c) one-leg standing, d) forward lunge, and e) lateral lunge.
Mentions: The hip JRFs from LifeMod were analyzed at the three different times, at early (loading response), mid (mid-stance), and late stance (swing leg heel-strike), which represent maximum and minimum loading during level walking (Figure 3a). The results showed that the peak hip compressive force reached over 650 N and 390 N in the early and late stance (Table 1). Figure 3b shows the hip JRF patterns in the squat with the three vertical lines representing early (maximum knee flexion), mid (mid extension), and late stance (erect position). The compressive JRF in ANSYS showed smaller loading in the early and mid-stance, and higher loading in the late stance (Table 1). Figure 3c shows the hip JRF patterns of LifeMod in the one-leg standing with the 3 lines representing the early (swing leg leaving ground), mid (mid swing) and late stance (swing leg reaching highest point). The ANSYS compressive hip JRF reached similar levels of loading at the three different critical times (Table 1). The hip JRFs in LifeMod were provided in Figure 3d with values analyzed at early (touchdown of front leg), mid (lowest point of center of gravity (COG)), and late stance (trailing leg off ground). The compressive JRF in ANSYS was higher in the early and mid- stance while the shear JRF was highest in the late stance and lowest in the mid stance (Table 1). Figure 3e shows the JRF patterns of the lateral lunge with the 3 lines representing the early (leading leg touchdown), mid (lowest COG position), and late stance (contralateral leg off ground). The ANSYS compressive and shear forces were highest in late stance in the movement (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc.The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures.Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport Science, Nanjing Sport Institute, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of the study was to establish a dynamics model and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model to analyze loading characteristics of femoral neck during walking, squat, single-leg standing, and forward and lateral lunges. One male volunteer performed three trials of the five movements. The 3D kinematic data were captured and imported into the LifeMOD to establish a musculoskeletal dynamics model to obtain joint reaction and muscle forces of iliacus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, psoas major and adductor magnus. The loading data LfeMOD were imported and transformed into a hip finite-element model. The results of the finite element femur model showed that stress was localized along the compression arc and the tension arc. In addition, the trabecular bone and tension lines of the Ward's triangle also demonstrated high stress. The compact bone received the greatest peak stress in the forward lunge and the least stress in the squat. However, the spongy bone in the femoral neck region had the greatest stress during the walk and the least stress in the squat. The results from this study indicate that the forward lunge may be an effective method to prevent femoral neck fractures. Walking is another effective and simple method that may improve bone mass of the Ward's triangle and prevent osteoporosis and femoral neck fracture.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus