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Prognostic impact of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR) irrespective of concomitant comorbidities: a retrospective matched cohort study.

Prakash R, Horsfall M, Markwick A, Pumar M, Lee L, Sinhal A, Joseph MX, Chew DP - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant MR with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and age between 75 and 85 years were associated with a substantial reduction in median survival by 2.3 years.Significant MR with LV systolic dysfunction, age beyond 85 and advance comorbidities were associated with a lesser reduction in median survival by 0.2 years.Significant MR in patients with multiple comorbidities leads to increase in death and heart failure rehospitalisation with reduced estimated median survival.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Freedom from death or heart failure readmission over 5 years (unadjusted) between patients with and without significant mitral regurgitation.
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BMJOPEN2014004984F2: Freedom from death or heart failure readmission over 5 years (unadjusted) between patients with and without significant mitral regurgitation.

Mentions: Patients with significant MR were more likely to experience hospital admissions for heart failure (table 2). The greatest relative increase in heart failure admissions was evident at 12 months. The time to any rehospitalisation or heart failure rehospitalisation was shorter among the patients with significant MR but the difference was not significant. Overall, significant MR was associated with a higher rate of mortality across the follow-up period, with this difference being evident at 12 months but diminishing over the longer term. The Kaplan-Meier survival plots for the entire cohort and patients over 75 years are presented in figures 2 and 3, respectively. No differences were observed in the rates of stroke or atrial fibrillation admissions.


Prognostic impact of moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR) irrespective of concomitant comorbidities: a retrospective matched cohort study.

Prakash R, Horsfall M, Markwick A, Pumar M, Lee L, Sinhal A, Joseph MX, Chew DP - BMJ Open (2014)

Freedom from death or heart failure readmission over 5 years (unadjusted) between patients with and without significant mitral regurgitation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120438&req=5

BMJOPEN2014004984F2: Freedom from death or heart failure readmission over 5 years (unadjusted) between patients with and without significant mitral regurgitation.
Mentions: Patients with significant MR were more likely to experience hospital admissions for heart failure (table 2). The greatest relative increase in heart failure admissions was evident at 12 months. The time to any rehospitalisation or heart failure rehospitalisation was shorter among the patients with significant MR but the difference was not significant. Overall, significant MR was associated with a higher rate of mortality across the follow-up period, with this difference being evident at 12 months but diminishing over the longer term. The Kaplan-Meier survival plots for the entire cohort and patients over 75 years are presented in figures 2 and 3, respectively. No differences were observed in the rates of stroke or atrial fibrillation admissions.

Bottom Line: Significant MR with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and age between 75 and 85 years were associated with a substantial reduction in median survival by 2.3 years.Significant MR with LV systolic dysfunction, age beyond 85 and advance comorbidities were associated with a lesser reduction in median survival by 0.2 years.Significant MR in patients with multiple comorbidities leads to increase in death and heart failure rehospitalisation with reduced estimated median survival.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus