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Resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord.

Barry RL, Smith SA, Dula AN, Gore JC - Elife (2014)

Bottom Line: Functional magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is well established as one of the most powerful methods for mapping human brain function.However, to date there have been no previous substantiated reports of resting state correlations in the spinal cord.In a cohort of healthy volunteers, we observed robust functional connectivity between left and right ventral (motor) horns, and between left and right dorsal (sensory) horns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Nashville, United States Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, United States robert.l.barry@vanderbilt.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Power spectra across gray and white matter sub-regions for data filtered between 0.01 and 0.13 Hz.Power spectra for (A) ventral and (B) dorsal GM sub-regions in Figure 5—figure supplement 5C that exhibit significant positive correlations in the original analysis (Figure 5A; z > 1.65; one-tailed), and all WM sub-regions. For each frequency the plotted power represents median power across slices and subjects. Within the range of higher frequencies between 0.075 Hz and 0.125 Hz, ventral GM exhibits 28% more power than WM whereas dorsal GM and WM exhibit comparable total power (< 0.3% difference). These data show that the original filter bandwidth between 0.01 Hz and 0.08 Hz was a sound choice, but also suggest that frequencies slightly above 0.08 Hz may contain additional power related to GM connectivity. Future work will acquire resting state spinal cord data with a faster sampling rate to better understand the relative frequency-dependent contributions from BOLD signal fluctuations and physiological noise.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02812.014
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fig5s6: Power spectra across gray and white matter sub-regions for data filtered between 0.01 and 0.13 Hz.Power spectra for (A) ventral and (B) dorsal GM sub-regions in Figure 5—figure supplement 5C that exhibit significant positive correlations in the original analysis (Figure 5A; z > 1.65; one-tailed), and all WM sub-regions. For each frequency the plotted power represents median power across slices and subjects. Within the range of higher frequencies between 0.075 Hz and 0.125 Hz, ventral GM exhibits 28% more power than WM whereas dorsal GM and WM exhibit comparable total power (< 0.3% difference). These data show that the original filter bandwidth between 0.01 Hz and 0.08 Hz was a sound choice, but also suggest that frequencies slightly above 0.08 Hz may contain additional power related to GM connectivity. Future work will acquire resting state spinal cord data with a faster sampling rate to better understand the relative frequency-dependent contributions from BOLD signal fluctuations and physiological noise.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02812.014

Mentions: Functional connectivity matrices resulting from preprocessing pipeline permutations after band-pass filtering between 0.01 and 0.13 Hz (*p<0.05; **p<0.01; Bonferroni corrected). For clarity the labels are not shown for each column/row but are the same as in Figure 5. (A) Preprocessing was performed as described in the Methods except CSF and WM regressors (steps #11 and #12) were not applied, and step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. (B) Preprocessing was performed as described in ‘Materials and methods’ except a WM regressor (step #12) was not applied and step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. (C) Preprocessing was performed as described in ‘Materials and methods’ except step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. (D) Preprocessing was performed as described in ‘Materials and methods’ except step #12 extracted the principal eigenvector of all time series within a combined WM and GM mask and step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. The inclusion of frequencies between 0.08 Hz and 0.13 Hz primarily strengthens GM correlations between ventral horns (relative to the results obtained using only frequencies between 0.01 Hz and 0.08 Hz) but also increases the statistical significance of WM correlations between LD and RD. Power spectra for WM and GM sub-regions in (C) are presented in Figure 5—figure supplement 6.


Resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord.

Barry RL, Smith SA, Dula AN, Gore JC - Elife (2014)

Power spectra across gray and white matter sub-regions for data filtered between 0.01 and 0.13 Hz.Power spectra for (A) ventral and (B) dorsal GM sub-regions in Figure 5—figure supplement 5C that exhibit significant positive correlations in the original analysis (Figure 5A; z > 1.65; one-tailed), and all WM sub-regions. For each frequency the plotted power represents median power across slices and subjects. Within the range of higher frequencies between 0.075 Hz and 0.125 Hz, ventral GM exhibits 28% more power than WM whereas dorsal GM and WM exhibit comparable total power (< 0.3% difference). These data show that the original filter bandwidth between 0.01 Hz and 0.08 Hz was a sound choice, but also suggest that frequencies slightly above 0.08 Hz may contain additional power related to GM connectivity. Future work will acquire resting state spinal cord data with a faster sampling rate to better understand the relative frequency-dependent contributions from BOLD signal fluctuations and physiological noise.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02812.014
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120419&req=5

fig5s6: Power spectra across gray and white matter sub-regions for data filtered between 0.01 and 0.13 Hz.Power spectra for (A) ventral and (B) dorsal GM sub-regions in Figure 5—figure supplement 5C that exhibit significant positive correlations in the original analysis (Figure 5A; z > 1.65; one-tailed), and all WM sub-regions. For each frequency the plotted power represents median power across slices and subjects. Within the range of higher frequencies between 0.075 Hz and 0.125 Hz, ventral GM exhibits 28% more power than WM whereas dorsal GM and WM exhibit comparable total power (< 0.3% difference). These data show that the original filter bandwidth between 0.01 Hz and 0.08 Hz was a sound choice, but also suggest that frequencies slightly above 0.08 Hz may contain additional power related to GM connectivity. Future work will acquire resting state spinal cord data with a faster sampling rate to better understand the relative frequency-dependent contributions from BOLD signal fluctuations and physiological noise.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02812.014
Mentions: Functional connectivity matrices resulting from preprocessing pipeline permutations after band-pass filtering between 0.01 and 0.13 Hz (*p<0.05; **p<0.01; Bonferroni corrected). For clarity the labels are not shown for each column/row but are the same as in Figure 5. (A) Preprocessing was performed as described in the Methods except CSF and WM regressors (steps #11 and #12) were not applied, and step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. (B) Preprocessing was performed as described in ‘Materials and methods’ except a WM regressor (step #12) was not applied and step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. (C) Preprocessing was performed as described in ‘Materials and methods’ except step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. (D) Preprocessing was performed as described in ‘Materials and methods’ except step #12 extracted the principal eigenvector of all time series within a combined WM and GM mask and step #13 used a different frequency bandwidth. The inclusion of frequencies between 0.08 Hz and 0.13 Hz primarily strengthens GM correlations between ventral horns (relative to the results obtained using only frequencies between 0.01 Hz and 0.08 Hz) but also increases the statistical significance of WM correlations between LD and RD. Power spectra for WM and GM sub-regions in (C) are presented in Figure 5—figure supplement 6.

Bottom Line: Functional magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is well established as one of the most powerful methods for mapping human brain function.However, to date there have been no previous substantiated reports of resting state correlations in the spinal cord.In a cohort of healthy volunteers, we observed robust functional connectivity between left and right ventral (motor) horns, and between left and right dorsal (sensory) horns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Nashville, United States Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, United States robert.l.barry@vanderbilt.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus