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Dynamic pattern of suicide in Australia, 1986-2005: a descriptive-analytic study.

Qi X, Hu W, Page A, Tong S - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Male suicides were mainly completed by hanging, firearms, gases and self-poisoning.Female suicides were primarily completed by hanging and self-poisoning.Areas with a high proportion of indigenous population (eg, northwest of Queensland and top north of the Northern Territory) had shown a substantial increase in suicide incidence after 1995.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia.

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Suicide rates among different groups across Australia (1986–2005).
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BMJOPEN2014005311F3: Suicide rates among different groups across Australia (1986–2005).

Mentions: Figure 3 shows that among those aged 15–34 years, the north and central south areas of the NT, the northeast and some southern parts of WA, the northwest and central inland areas of Queensland (QLD) and some inland areas of New South Wales (NSW) had higher suicide (A2). The patterns were also similar for males (NT, QLD and WA in B1). Those aged between 35 and 74 years had fewer high-risk areas than those aged 15–34 (A2 and A3). For those aged 75 years and over, suicide in northern and inland QLD and a small number of LGAs in NSW and WA were higher than in other areas. Around 40% of total LGAs and unincorporated SLAs in NT and SA had no suicide data. Compared with males, a greater number of areas had no female suicide data (B2). Rural and remote areas had lower rates of suicide by self-poisoning than urban areas, except for some LGAs in inland QLD, east SA and south WA (C2).


Dynamic pattern of suicide in Australia, 1986-2005: a descriptive-analytic study.

Qi X, Hu W, Page A, Tong S - BMJ Open (2014)

Suicide rates among different groups across Australia (1986–2005).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120400&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005311F3: Suicide rates among different groups across Australia (1986–2005).
Mentions: Figure 3 shows that among those aged 15–34 years, the north and central south areas of the NT, the northeast and some southern parts of WA, the northwest and central inland areas of Queensland (QLD) and some inland areas of New South Wales (NSW) had higher suicide (A2). The patterns were also similar for males (NT, QLD and WA in B1). Those aged between 35 and 74 years had fewer high-risk areas than those aged 15–34 (A2 and A3). For those aged 75 years and over, suicide in northern and inland QLD and a small number of LGAs in NSW and WA were higher than in other areas. Around 40% of total LGAs and unincorporated SLAs in NT and SA had no suicide data. Compared with males, a greater number of areas had no female suicide data (B2). Rural and remote areas had lower rates of suicide by self-poisoning than urban areas, except for some LGAs in inland QLD, east SA and south WA (C2).

Bottom Line: Male suicides were mainly completed by hanging, firearms, gases and self-poisoning.Female suicides were primarily completed by hanging and self-poisoning.Areas with a high proportion of indigenous population (eg, northwest of Queensland and top north of the Northern Territory) had shown a substantial increase in suicide incidence after 1995.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus