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Lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in urban Africans presenting with communicable versus non-communicable forms of heart disease: the 'Heart of Soweto' hospital registry study.

Lyons JG, Sliwa K, Carrington MJ, Raal F, Pretorius S, Thienemann F, Stewart S - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Cardiology Unit, Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.Lipid profiles were compared according to prespecified classification of non-communicable (eg, hypertensive HD) versus communicable (eg, rheumatic HD) HD.Comparatively, overall prevalence of high TC was 32% and high LDLC was 37%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol according to heart disease aetiology. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease. High total cholesterol (TC) >4.5 mmol/L; Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) (<1.0 mmol/L in men, <1.2 mmol/L in women). High low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) >2.5 mmol/L; High triglycerides (TGs) >1.7 mmol/L.
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BMJOPEN2014005069F2: Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol according to heart disease aetiology. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease. High total cholesterol (TC) >4.5 mmol/L; Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) (<1.0 mmol/L in men, <1.2 mmol/L in women). High low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) >2.5 mmol/L; High triglycerides (TGs) >1.7 mmol/L.

Mentions: Levels of TC (figure 1A), HDLC (figure 1B) and LDLC (figure 1C) were significantly higher in women with NCD (figure 1). However, in those diagnosed with CD, small, but significant, differences were observed only for TC and HDLC, not LDL (figure 1). Overall, prevalence of dyslipidaemia varied from 18% of patients with high TGs to 58% with low HDLC (table 1 and figure 2). Consistent with the decrease observed with the actual levels, prevalence of high TC and high LDLC was increased in those with NCD aetiologies while low HDLC levels prevalence was higher in those with CD (table 1 and figure 2). There were no patients with TG levels >4.5 mmol/L (range 0.1–3.8 mmol/L) which makes use of the Friedewald equation suitable for this cohort.18


Lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in urban Africans presenting with communicable versus non-communicable forms of heart disease: the 'Heart of Soweto' hospital registry study.

Lyons JG, Sliwa K, Carrington MJ, Raal F, Pretorius S, Thienemann F, Stewart S - BMJ Open (2014)

Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol according to heart disease aetiology. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease. High total cholesterol (TC) >4.5 mmol/L; Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) (<1.0 mmol/L in men, <1.2 mmol/L in women). High low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) >2.5 mmol/L; High triglycerides (TGs) >1.7 mmol/L.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120399&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005069F2: Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol according to heart disease aetiology. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease. High total cholesterol (TC) >4.5 mmol/L; Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) (<1.0 mmol/L in men, <1.2 mmol/L in women). High low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) >2.5 mmol/L; High triglycerides (TGs) >1.7 mmol/L.
Mentions: Levels of TC (figure 1A), HDLC (figure 1B) and LDLC (figure 1C) were significantly higher in women with NCD (figure 1). However, in those diagnosed with CD, small, but significant, differences were observed only for TC and HDLC, not LDL (figure 1). Overall, prevalence of dyslipidaemia varied from 18% of patients with high TGs to 58% with low HDLC (table 1 and figure 2). Consistent with the decrease observed with the actual levels, prevalence of high TC and high LDLC was increased in those with NCD aetiologies while low HDLC levels prevalence was higher in those with CD (table 1 and figure 2). There were no patients with TG levels >4.5 mmol/L (range 0.1–3.8 mmol/L) which makes use of the Friedewald equation suitable for this cohort.18

Bottom Line: Cardiology Unit, Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.Lipid profiles were compared according to prespecified classification of non-communicable (eg, hypertensive HD) versus communicable (eg, rheumatic HD) HD.Comparatively, overall prevalence of high TC was 32% and high LDLC was 37%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus