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Lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in urban Africans presenting with communicable versus non-communicable forms of heart disease: the 'Heart of Soweto' hospital registry study.

Lyons JG, Sliwa K, Carrington MJ, Raal F, Pretorius S, Thienemann F, Stewart S - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Cardiology Unit, Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.Lipid profiles were compared according to prespecified classification of non-communicable (eg, hypertensive HD) versus communicable (eg, rheumatic HD) HD.Comparatively, overall prevalence of high TC was 32% and high LDLC was 37%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sex specific lipid profiles according to heart disease aetiology. Lipid values are shown as mean±SE. p Values indicate between-sex comparisons per aetiology group (t test), **p<0.01; *p<0.05. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease; TC, total cholesterol; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; LDL, low-density lipoprotein. Y-axis dotted lines show thresholds for high TC and LDL or low HDL (sex specific values).
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BMJOPEN2014005069F1: Sex specific lipid profiles according to heart disease aetiology. Lipid values are shown as mean±SE. p Values indicate between-sex comparisons per aetiology group (t test), **p<0.01; *p<0.05. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease; TC, total cholesterol; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; LDL, low-density lipoprotein. Y-axis dotted lines show thresholds for high TC and LDL or low HDL (sex specific values).

Mentions: Those with CD have significantly lower TC, LDLC and HDLC compared with patients with NCD (table 1 and figure 1, p<0.001 for all comparisons). Overall, women had significantly higher TC (4.2±1.3 vs 3.8±1.2 mmol/L, p<0.001), LDLC (2.4±1.0 vs 2.2±1.0 mmol/L, p<0.01) and HDLC compared with men (1.2±0.5 vs 1.0±0.5 mmol/L, p<0.001). This gender difference did not extend to TGs (1.1(0.4–1.8) vs 1.1(0.4–1.8) mmol/L, p=0.7) nor TC : HDLC ratio (4.2±3.1 vs 4.3±2.7 mmol/L, p=0.6). Lipid ratios were calculated and compared (table 1). There were no significant differences between aetiology groups for either TC : HDL or TG : HDL groups. However LDL : HDL ratios were significantly higher in the communicable group.


Lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in urban Africans presenting with communicable versus non-communicable forms of heart disease: the 'Heart of Soweto' hospital registry study.

Lyons JG, Sliwa K, Carrington MJ, Raal F, Pretorius S, Thienemann F, Stewart S - BMJ Open (2014)

Sex specific lipid profiles according to heart disease aetiology. Lipid values are shown as mean±SE. p Values indicate between-sex comparisons per aetiology group (t test), **p<0.01; *p<0.05. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease; TC, total cholesterol; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; LDL, low-density lipoprotein. Y-axis dotted lines show thresholds for high TC and LDL or low HDL (sex specific values).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120399&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005069F1: Sex specific lipid profiles according to heart disease aetiology. Lipid values are shown as mean±SE. p Values indicate between-sex comparisons per aetiology group (t test), **p<0.01; *p<0.05. NCD, non-communicable heart disease; CD, communicable heart disease; TC, total cholesterol; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; LDL, low-density lipoprotein. Y-axis dotted lines show thresholds for high TC and LDL or low HDL (sex specific values).
Mentions: Those with CD have significantly lower TC, LDLC and HDLC compared with patients with NCD (table 1 and figure 1, p<0.001 for all comparisons). Overall, women had significantly higher TC (4.2±1.3 vs 3.8±1.2 mmol/L, p<0.001), LDLC (2.4±1.0 vs 2.2±1.0 mmol/L, p<0.01) and HDLC compared with men (1.2±0.5 vs 1.0±0.5 mmol/L, p<0.001). This gender difference did not extend to TGs (1.1(0.4–1.8) vs 1.1(0.4–1.8) mmol/L, p=0.7) nor TC : HDLC ratio (4.2±3.1 vs 4.3±2.7 mmol/L, p=0.6). Lipid ratios were calculated and compared (table 1). There were no significant differences between aetiology groups for either TC : HDL or TG : HDL groups. However LDL : HDL ratios were significantly higher in the communicable group.

Bottom Line: Cardiology Unit, Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.Lipid profiles were compared according to prespecified classification of non-communicable (eg, hypertensive HD) versus communicable (eg, rheumatic HD) HD.Comparatively, overall prevalence of high TC was 32% and high LDLC was 37%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus