Limits...
Coverage of common cancer types in UK national newspapers: a content analysis.

Konfortion J, Jack RH, Davies EA - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Breast cancer was covered most often overall and by newspaper category while the lower coverage of other cancer types did not consistently mirror the relative number of new cases each year.Coverage of breast cancer and bowel cancer appears to be influenced by their awareness months, while that of prostate cancer and lung cancer is influenced by other media stories.Health-promoting public bodies and campaigners could learn from the success of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and work more closely with journalists to ensure that the relevant messages reach wider audiences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health England, Knowledge and Intelligence Team (London), London, UK King's College London, Cancer Epidemiology and Population Health, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of breast, lung, prostate and bowel cancer articles published per month (in 2011 and 2012) in UK National newspapers overall.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120380&req=5

BMJOPEN2013004677F1: Proportion of breast, lung, prostate and bowel cancer articles published per month (in 2011 and 2012) in UK National newspapers overall.

Mentions: Coverage of breast cancer was the most frequent in both years with a total of 4237 articles. Peaks in its coverage were in July and October 2011, and October 2012 (figure 1A). Coverage in July 2011, which made up 11% of the published articles in that year, had a high proportion of articles tagged under the subject area ‘Sports & Recreation’. These articles referred to the case of a golf champion's wife who had died from breast cancer. October 2011 and 2012 had the highest proportions of coverage, 12% in 2011 and 17% in 2012, which coincided with Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The subject focus of these articles was still concentrated around the top five main subject areas.


Coverage of common cancer types in UK national newspapers: a content analysis.

Konfortion J, Jack RH, Davies EA - BMJ Open (2014)

Proportion of breast, lung, prostate and bowel cancer articles published per month (in 2011 and 2012) in UK National newspapers overall.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120380&req=5

BMJOPEN2013004677F1: Proportion of breast, lung, prostate and bowel cancer articles published per month (in 2011 and 2012) in UK National newspapers overall.
Mentions: Coverage of breast cancer was the most frequent in both years with a total of 4237 articles. Peaks in its coverage were in July and October 2011, and October 2012 (figure 1A). Coverage in July 2011, which made up 11% of the published articles in that year, had a high proportion of articles tagged under the subject area ‘Sports & Recreation’. These articles referred to the case of a golf champion's wife who had died from breast cancer. October 2011 and 2012 had the highest proportions of coverage, 12% in 2011 and 17% in 2012, which coincided with Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The subject focus of these articles was still concentrated around the top five main subject areas.

Bottom Line: Breast cancer was covered most often overall and by newspaper category while the lower coverage of other cancer types did not consistently mirror the relative number of new cases each year.Coverage of breast cancer and bowel cancer appears to be influenced by their awareness months, while that of prostate cancer and lung cancer is influenced by other media stories.Health-promoting public bodies and campaigners could learn from the success of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and work more closely with journalists to ensure that the relevant messages reach wider audiences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health England, Knowledge and Intelligence Team (London), London, UK King's College London, Cancer Epidemiology and Population Health, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus