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Prevalence of birefringent crystals in cardiac and prostatic tissues, an observational study.

Park JJ, Roudier MP, Soman D, Mokadam NA, Simkin PA - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of urate crystals in residual tissue samples from coronary arteries, aortic valves and prostate glands was assessed.Alcohol-fixed coronary arteries from 55 explanted hearts, alcohol-fixed aortic valves collected from 75 valve replacement surgeries and 40 frozen, unfixed prostate specimens resected during cancer surgery were examined for birefringent crystals with polarising microscopy.We found that a remarkable percentage of coronary arteries and prostate specimens contained birefringent crystals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine (Rheumatology), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intracellular negatively birefringent crystals in the intima of a left anterior descending artery (left) as seen with polarising microscopy. White arrow denotes a first-order red plate axis. Deconvolution confocal microscopy image of the same cell showing intracellular crystals (right).
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BMJOPEN2014005308F1: Intracellular negatively birefringent crystals in the intima of a left anterior descending artery (left) as seen with polarising microscopy. White arrow denotes a first-order red plate axis. Deconvolution confocal microscopy image of the same cell showing intracellular crystals (right).

Mentions: Of the 55 hearts examined, 6 arteries from different hearts (10.9%), contained birefringent crystals. One patient had intracellular, negatively birefringent, acicular crystals in the intima of the left anterior descending (figure 1). One patient had a microtophus in the intima of the left anterior descending (figure 2). One patient had negatively birefringent crystals and microtophi in the adventitia of the right coronary artery (figure 3). Three additional patients had highly birefringent accumulations of intimal, extracellular unidentifiable crystals.


Prevalence of birefringent crystals in cardiac and prostatic tissues, an observational study.

Park JJ, Roudier MP, Soman D, Mokadam NA, Simkin PA - BMJ Open (2014)

Intracellular negatively birefringent crystals in the intima of a left anterior descending artery (left) as seen with polarising microscopy. White arrow denotes a first-order red plate axis. Deconvolution confocal microscopy image of the same cell showing intracellular crystals (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120371&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005308F1: Intracellular negatively birefringent crystals in the intima of a left anterior descending artery (left) as seen with polarising microscopy. White arrow denotes a first-order red plate axis. Deconvolution confocal microscopy image of the same cell showing intracellular crystals (right).
Mentions: Of the 55 hearts examined, 6 arteries from different hearts (10.9%), contained birefringent crystals. One patient had intracellular, negatively birefringent, acicular crystals in the intima of the left anterior descending (figure 1). One patient had a microtophus in the intima of the left anterior descending (figure 2). One patient had negatively birefringent crystals and microtophi in the adventitia of the right coronary artery (figure 3). Three additional patients had highly birefringent accumulations of intimal, extracellular unidentifiable crystals.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of urate crystals in residual tissue samples from coronary arteries, aortic valves and prostate glands was assessed.Alcohol-fixed coronary arteries from 55 explanted hearts, alcohol-fixed aortic valves collected from 75 valve replacement surgeries and 40 frozen, unfixed prostate specimens resected during cancer surgery were examined for birefringent crystals with polarising microscopy.We found that a remarkable percentage of coronary arteries and prostate specimens contained birefringent crystals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine (Rheumatology), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus