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Visceral leishmaniasis-associated mortality in Bangladesh: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

Huda MM, Chowdhury R, Ghosh D, Dash AP, Bhattacharya SK, Mondal D - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Tribal ethnicity had an 18 times (OR=18.1, 95% CI 3.6 to 90.6) higher risk for VL deaths compared with Bangali ethnicity (p<0.0001).VL deaths were found to be high in the study areas and were under-reported.The national VL Elimination Programme should give special attention to the tribal community in the endemic areas, especially for those in Rajshahi, and should strengthen VL surveillance by including tertiary hospitals in the national surveillance system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Population, Urbanization and Climate Change, icddr,b, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study area map including spatial distribution of households, households with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and VL deaths during August 2009–December 2011 (HH, household).
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BMJOPEN2014005408F2: Study area map including spatial distribution of households, households with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and VL deaths during August 2009–December 2011 (HH, household).

Mentions: Among the 12 confirmed VL deaths, 50% (6/12) were children aged below 17 years and 75% (9/12) were male. Most of the deaths occurred in tribal ethnic populations, which accounted for 83.3% (10/12) of total VL deaths. About 33.3% (4/12) of all confirmed deaths did not receive treatment during their illness that led to death. Tuberculosis as an associated illness was found in 8.3% (1/12) of the deceased. The majority of the deaths occurred at home and the rest were in the tertiary hospital (table 3). While checking the existing VL surveillance data, none of these 12 VL deaths were found. The spatial distribution of households with VL and VL deaths during August 2009–December 2011 is shown in figure 2.


Visceral leishmaniasis-associated mortality in Bangladesh: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

Huda MM, Chowdhury R, Ghosh D, Dash AP, Bhattacharya SK, Mondal D - BMJ Open (2014)

Study area map including spatial distribution of households, households with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and VL deaths during August 2009–December 2011 (HH, household).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120369&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005408F2: Study area map including spatial distribution of households, households with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and VL deaths during August 2009–December 2011 (HH, household).
Mentions: Among the 12 confirmed VL deaths, 50% (6/12) were children aged below 17 years and 75% (9/12) were male. Most of the deaths occurred in tribal ethnic populations, which accounted for 83.3% (10/12) of total VL deaths. About 33.3% (4/12) of all confirmed deaths did not receive treatment during their illness that led to death. Tuberculosis as an associated illness was found in 8.3% (1/12) of the deceased. The majority of the deaths occurred at home and the rest were in the tertiary hospital (table 3). While checking the existing VL surveillance data, none of these 12 VL deaths were found. The spatial distribution of households with VL and VL deaths during August 2009–December 2011 is shown in figure 2.

Bottom Line: Tribal ethnicity had an 18 times (OR=18.1, 95% CI 3.6 to 90.6) higher risk for VL deaths compared with Bangali ethnicity (p<0.0001).VL deaths were found to be high in the study areas and were under-reported.The national VL Elimination Programme should give special attention to the tribal community in the endemic areas, especially for those in Rajshahi, and should strengthen VL surveillance by including tertiary hospitals in the national surveillance system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Population, Urbanization and Climate Change, icddr,b, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus