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Biometric risk factors for corneal neovascularization associated with hydrogel soft contact lens wear in Korean myopic patients.

Lee DS, Kim MK, Wee WR - Korean J Ophthalmol (2014)

Bottom Line: Ninety-three age- and sex-matched patients (93 eyes) who wore SCLs, who did not have corneal NV and who visited our clinic for correction of refractive errors were included in the control group.The degree of spherical equivalent, astigmatism and corneal base curve radius (BCR) were compared in both groups.High myopia, high astigmatism, and steep cornea seemed to be risk factors in the development of corneal NV in SCL wearers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ; Laboratory of Ocular Regenerative Medicine and Immunology, Seoul Artificial Eye Center, Seoul National University Hospital Clinical Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the biometric risk factors for corneal surface complications associated with hydrogel soft contact lens (SCL) fitting in myopic patients in Korea.

Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study. The records of 124 subjects (124 eyes) who wore SCLs on a daily basis were reviewed. Thirty-one patients (31 eyes) who were diagnosed with corneal neovascularization (NV) while wearing SCLs were included in the complication group. Ninety-three age- and sex-matched patients (93 eyes) who wore SCLs, who did not have corneal NV and who visited our clinic for correction of refractive errors were included in the control group. The degree of spherical equivalent, astigmatism and corneal base curve radius (BCR) were compared in both groups.

Results: Patients with NV exhibited poorer best corrected visual acuity and more myopia than controls (p = 0.008 and 0.006, respectively). In univariate analysis, highly myopic patients (-9 diopters [D] or higher) were more likely to experience NV (odds ratio [OR], 2.232; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.602 to 3.105). High astigmatism (≥2 D) increased the risk of complications (OR, 2.717; 95% CI, 1.141 to 6.451). Steep cornea, in which BCR was <7.5 mm, also raised the risk of complications (OR, 4.000; 95% CI, 1.661 to 9.804). Flat cornea was not a risk factor for the development of NV.

Conclusions: High myopia, high astigmatism, and steep cornea seemed to be risk factors in the development of corneal NV in SCL wearers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The frequency distribution of astigmatism among soft contact lens wearers between (control group vs. corneal neovascularization group).
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Figure 3: The frequency distribution of astigmatism among soft contact lens wearers between (control group vs. corneal neovascularization group).

Mentions: Next, we assessed the cut-off value of parameters for contact-lens fitting as risk factors. Frequency distribution graphs had the potential to provide an overview of cut-off values before univariate and multivariate analysis. The representative complications, frequency distribution of spherical equivalent, astigmatism, and the base curve radius of the cornea for SCL users who did and did not develop NV are exhibited in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 4. The greater proportion of complication group to control group was revealed in above -9 D of spherical equivalent. The degree of astigmatism in the complications group was also higher in proportion to control group, especially greater than -2 D. The complications group also exhibited steeper corneas, in which the base curve radius was 7.40 mm less than that of the control group.


Biometric risk factors for corneal neovascularization associated with hydrogel soft contact lens wear in Korean myopic patients.

Lee DS, Kim MK, Wee WR - Korean J Ophthalmol (2014)

The frequency distribution of astigmatism among soft contact lens wearers between (control group vs. corneal neovascularization group).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120349&req=5

Figure 3: The frequency distribution of astigmatism among soft contact lens wearers between (control group vs. corneal neovascularization group).
Mentions: Next, we assessed the cut-off value of parameters for contact-lens fitting as risk factors. Frequency distribution graphs had the potential to provide an overview of cut-off values before univariate and multivariate analysis. The representative complications, frequency distribution of spherical equivalent, astigmatism, and the base curve radius of the cornea for SCL users who did and did not develop NV are exhibited in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 4. The greater proportion of complication group to control group was revealed in above -9 D of spherical equivalent. The degree of astigmatism in the complications group was also higher in proportion to control group, especially greater than -2 D. The complications group also exhibited steeper corneas, in which the base curve radius was 7.40 mm less than that of the control group.

Bottom Line: Ninety-three age- and sex-matched patients (93 eyes) who wore SCLs, who did not have corneal NV and who visited our clinic for correction of refractive errors were included in the control group.The degree of spherical equivalent, astigmatism and corneal base curve radius (BCR) were compared in both groups.High myopia, high astigmatism, and steep cornea seemed to be risk factors in the development of corneal NV in SCL wearers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ; Laboratory of Ocular Regenerative Medicine and Immunology, Seoul Artificial Eye Center, Seoul National University Hospital Clinical Research Institute, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the biometric risk factors for corneal surface complications associated with hydrogel soft contact lens (SCL) fitting in myopic patients in Korea.

Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study. The records of 124 subjects (124 eyes) who wore SCLs on a daily basis were reviewed. Thirty-one patients (31 eyes) who were diagnosed with corneal neovascularization (NV) while wearing SCLs were included in the complication group. Ninety-three age- and sex-matched patients (93 eyes) who wore SCLs, who did not have corneal NV and who visited our clinic for correction of refractive errors were included in the control group. The degree of spherical equivalent, astigmatism and corneal base curve radius (BCR) were compared in both groups.

Results: Patients with NV exhibited poorer best corrected visual acuity and more myopia than controls (p = 0.008 and 0.006, respectively). In univariate analysis, highly myopic patients (-9 diopters [D] or higher) were more likely to experience NV (odds ratio [OR], 2.232; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.602 to 3.105). High astigmatism (≥2 D) increased the risk of complications (OR, 2.717; 95% CI, 1.141 to 6.451). Steep cornea, in which BCR was <7.5 mm, also raised the risk of complications (OR, 4.000; 95% CI, 1.661 to 9.804). Flat cornea was not a risk factor for the development of NV.

Conclusions: High myopia, high astigmatism, and steep cornea seemed to be risk factors in the development of corneal NV in SCL wearers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus