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Voltage control of metal-insulator transition and non-volatile ferroelastic switching of resistance in VOx/PMN-PT heterostructures.

Nan T, Liu M, Ren W, Ye ZG, Sun NX - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In this work, we demonstrate that a voltage-impulse-induced ferroelastic domain switching in the (011)-oriented 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.29PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates allows a robust non-volatile tuning of the metal-insulator transition in the VOx films deposited onto them.In such a VOx/PMN-PT heterostructure, the unique two-step electric polarization switching covers up to 90% of the entire poled area and contributes to a homogeneous in-plane anisotropic biaxial strain, which, in turn, enables the lattice changes and results in the suppression of metal-insulator transition in the mechanically coupled VOx films by 6 K with a resistance change up to 40% over a broad range of temperature.These findings provide a framework for realizing in situ and non-volatile tuning of strain-sensitive order parameters in strongly correlated materials, and demonstrate great potentials in delivering reconfigurable, compactable, and energy-efficient electronic devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
The central challenge in realizing electronics based on strongly correlated electronic states, or 'Mottronics', lies in finding an energy efficient way to switch between the distinct collective phases with a control voltage in a reversible and reproducible manner. In this work, we demonstrate that a voltage-impulse-induced ferroelastic domain switching in the (011)-oriented 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.29PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates allows a robust non-volatile tuning of the metal-insulator transition in the VOx films deposited onto them. In such a VOx/PMN-PT heterostructure, the unique two-step electric polarization switching covers up to 90% of the entire poled area and contributes to a homogeneous in-plane anisotropic biaxial strain, which, in turn, enables the lattice changes and results in the suppression of metal-insulator transition in the mechanically coupled VOx films by 6 K with a resistance change up to 40% over a broad range of temperature. These findings provide a framework for realizing in situ and non-volatile tuning of strain-sensitive order parameters in strongly correlated materials, and demonstrate great potentials in delivering reconfigurable, compactable, and energy-efficient electronic devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) The film resistance change induced by symmetric and asymmetric bipolar electric field sweeping at room temperature. The arrows indicate the directions of electric field sweeping. With the application of an asymmetric bipolar electric field, two stable film resistance states ‘A' and ‘B' can be realized. The inset is the schematics of 109°, 71° and 180° polarization switching induced by applying a negative voltage on a positively poled PMN-PT(011) substrate. (b) The film resistance as a function of temperature under two different poled states, where the polarization points to the out-of-plane direction (left inset) and stays in the (011) plane (right inset). These two strain states ‘A' and ‘B' correspond to the two remanant resitivity states.
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f3: (a) The film resistance change induced by symmetric and asymmetric bipolar electric field sweeping at room temperature. The arrows indicate the directions of electric field sweeping. With the application of an asymmetric bipolar electric field, two stable film resistance states ‘A' and ‘B' can be realized. The inset is the schematics of 109°, 71° and 180° polarization switching induced by applying a negative voltage on a positively poled PMN-PT(011) substrate. (b) The film resistance as a function of temperature under two different poled states, where the polarization points to the out-of-plane direction (left inset) and stays in the (011) plane (right inset). These two strain states ‘A' and ‘B' correspond to the two remanant resitivity states.

Mentions: The electric field modulation of the resistivity of VOx with different voltage switching pathways was characterized at room temperature (298 K), as shown in Figure 3 (a). An in-situ voltage was applied on a VOx/PMN-PT sample along the thickness direction, where the VOx film acted as the top electrode and the Au film coated on the backside of the PMN-PT substrate was used as the bottom electrode. Since the resistivity of the VOx thin film is much less than that of the PMN-PT bulk substrate, most of the applied voltage was homogeneously loaded on the PMN-PT substrate and thereby enabled a coherent lattice strain. Upon cycling a triangular electric field with an amplitude of 8 kV/cm, a ‘butterfly' curve (red) of the resistance vs. electric field was displayed (Fig. 3a), showing a relative resistance change of 8% at room temperature, which was defined as . This result is consistent with the typical ‘butterfly' curve of the strain vs. electric field expected for the PMN-PT substrate, indicating that the resistance change in the VOx films was induced by the lattice strain. In this symmetric bipolar electric field scenario (the strengths of the positive and negative fields are equal), the polarization that undergoes 109° and 180° ferroelectric switching at the coercive fields (inset in Fig. 3a) failed to create the distinct remnant strain states due to the strain equivalence in these domain states. However, upon increasing the strength of the electric field, a strong in-plane anisotropic biaxial strain can be generated, which resulted in the large changes in the resistivity of the VOx films. This strain effects are caused by the linear piezo-effect of the PMN-PT rather than the domain switching.


Voltage control of metal-insulator transition and non-volatile ferroelastic switching of resistance in VOx/PMN-PT heterostructures.

Nan T, Liu M, Ren W, Ye ZG, Sun NX - Sci Rep (2014)

(a) The film resistance change induced by symmetric and asymmetric bipolar electric field sweeping at room temperature. The arrows indicate the directions of electric field sweeping. With the application of an asymmetric bipolar electric field, two stable film resistance states ‘A' and ‘B' can be realized. The inset is the schematics of 109°, 71° and 180° polarization switching induced by applying a negative voltage on a positively poled PMN-PT(011) substrate. (b) The film resistance as a function of temperature under two different poled states, where the polarization points to the out-of-plane direction (left inset) and stays in the (011) plane (right inset). These two strain states ‘A' and ‘B' correspond to the two remanant resitivity states.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120346&req=5

f3: (a) The film resistance change induced by symmetric and asymmetric bipolar electric field sweeping at room temperature. The arrows indicate the directions of electric field sweeping. With the application of an asymmetric bipolar electric field, two stable film resistance states ‘A' and ‘B' can be realized. The inset is the schematics of 109°, 71° and 180° polarization switching induced by applying a negative voltage on a positively poled PMN-PT(011) substrate. (b) The film resistance as a function of temperature under two different poled states, where the polarization points to the out-of-plane direction (left inset) and stays in the (011) plane (right inset). These two strain states ‘A' and ‘B' correspond to the two remanant resitivity states.
Mentions: The electric field modulation of the resistivity of VOx with different voltage switching pathways was characterized at room temperature (298 K), as shown in Figure 3 (a). An in-situ voltage was applied on a VOx/PMN-PT sample along the thickness direction, where the VOx film acted as the top electrode and the Au film coated on the backside of the PMN-PT substrate was used as the bottom electrode. Since the resistivity of the VOx thin film is much less than that of the PMN-PT bulk substrate, most of the applied voltage was homogeneously loaded on the PMN-PT substrate and thereby enabled a coherent lattice strain. Upon cycling a triangular electric field with an amplitude of 8 kV/cm, a ‘butterfly' curve (red) of the resistance vs. electric field was displayed (Fig. 3a), showing a relative resistance change of 8% at room temperature, which was defined as . This result is consistent with the typical ‘butterfly' curve of the strain vs. electric field expected for the PMN-PT substrate, indicating that the resistance change in the VOx films was induced by the lattice strain. In this symmetric bipolar electric field scenario (the strengths of the positive and negative fields are equal), the polarization that undergoes 109° and 180° ferroelectric switching at the coercive fields (inset in Fig. 3a) failed to create the distinct remnant strain states due to the strain equivalence in these domain states. However, upon increasing the strength of the electric field, a strong in-plane anisotropic biaxial strain can be generated, which resulted in the large changes in the resistivity of the VOx films. This strain effects are caused by the linear piezo-effect of the PMN-PT rather than the domain switching.

Bottom Line: In this work, we demonstrate that a voltage-impulse-induced ferroelastic domain switching in the (011)-oriented 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.29PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates allows a robust non-volatile tuning of the metal-insulator transition in the VOx films deposited onto them.In such a VOx/PMN-PT heterostructure, the unique two-step electric polarization switching covers up to 90% of the entire poled area and contributes to a homogeneous in-plane anisotropic biaxial strain, which, in turn, enables the lattice changes and results in the suppression of metal-insulator transition in the mechanically coupled VOx films by 6 K with a resistance change up to 40% over a broad range of temperature.These findings provide a framework for realizing in situ and non-volatile tuning of strain-sensitive order parameters in strongly correlated materials, and demonstrate great potentials in delivering reconfigurable, compactable, and energy-efficient electronic devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
The central challenge in realizing electronics based on strongly correlated electronic states, or 'Mottronics', lies in finding an energy efficient way to switch between the distinct collective phases with a control voltage in a reversible and reproducible manner. In this work, we demonstrate that a voltage-impulse-induced ferroelastic domain switching in the (011)-oriented 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.29PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates allows a robust non-volatile tuning of the metal-insulator transition in the VOx films deposited onto them. In such a VOx/PMN-PT heterostructure, the unique two-step electric polarization switching covers up to 90% of the entire poled area and contributes to a homogeneous in-plane anisotropic biaxial strain, which, in turn, enables the lattice changes and results in the suppression of metal-insulator transition in the mechanically coupled VOx films by 6 K with a resistance change up to 40% over a broad range of temperature. These findings provide a framework for realizing in situ and non-volatile tuning of strain-sensitive order parameters in strongly correlated materials, and demonstrate great potentials in delivering reconfigurable, compactable, and energy-efficient electronic devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus