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Tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis update.

Yang J, Mao QX, Xu HX, Ma X, Zeng CY - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Tea consumption of ≥3 cups/day was associated with decreased T2DM risk in women (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.00).No obvious change was found in sensitivity analyses.The results suggest that daily tea consumption (≥3 cups/day) is associated with a lower T2DM risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plots of RR (relative risk) with 95% CI of T2DM associated with the tea consumption stratified (A) by the frequency of tea consumptiona in random model and (B) by random-effect model (≥3 cups/day of tea consumption vs the reference). aThe frequency of tea consumption was classified as non/lowest, 0–1, 1–3 and ≥4 cups/day. Non/lowest of tea consumption group was regarded as the reference. Black square means value of RR, and the size of the square means inversely proportional to its variance. Horizontal line means 95% CI of RR. Black diamond means pooled results. The studies were ordered by published year.
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BMJOPEN2014005632F2: Forest plots of RR (relative risk) with 95% CI of T2DM associated with the tea consumption stratified (A) by the frequency of tea consumptiona in random model and (B) by random-effect model (≥3 cups/day of tea consumption vs the reference). aThe frequency of tea consumption was classified as non/lowest, 0–1, 1–3 and ≥4 cups/day. Non/lowest of tea consumption group was regarded as the reference. Black square means value of RR, and the size of the square means inversely proportional to its variance. Horizontal line means 95% CI of RR. Black diamond means pooled results. The studies were ordered by published year.

Mentions: Random-effect model was used (Pheterogeneity=0.071, I2=27.0%). Overall, no statistically significant relationship between tea consumption and risk of T2DM was found according to 12 eligible studies (pooling RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.03, p=0.549). No statistically significant relationship was found in any stratified group, except for the comparison between the highest tea consumption (≥4 cups/day) group and the non-consumption/lowest consumption group (the reference). The corresponding RRs (95% CIs) and p values were 1.01 (0.96 to 1.06), 0.729 for <1 cup/day group versus the reference, 1.01 (0.97 to 1.05), 0.700 for 1–3 cup/day group versus the reference, and 0.84 (0.71 to 0.99), 0.036 for ≥4 cups/day group versus the reference, respectively (figure 2A).


Tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis update.

Yang J, Mao QX, Xu HX, Ma X, Zeng CY - BMJ Open (2014)

Forest plots of RR (relative risk) with 95% CI of T2DM associated with the tea consumption stratified (A) by the frequency of tea consumptiona in random model and (B) by random-effect model (≥3 cups/day of tea consumption vs the reference). aThe frequency of tea consumption was classified as non/lowest, 0–1, 1–3 and ≥4 cups/day. Non/lowest of tea consumption group was regarded as the reference. Black square means value of RR, and the size of the square means inversely proportional to its variance. Horizontal line means 95% CI of RR. Black diamond means pooled results. The studies were ordered by published year.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120344&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005632F2: Forest plots of RR (relative risk) with 95% CI of T2DM associated with the tea consumption stratified (A) by the frequency of tea consumptiona in random model and (B) by random-effect model (≥3 cups/day of tea consumption vs the reference). aThe frequency of tea consumption was classified as non/lowest, 0–1, 1–3 and ≥4 cups/day. Non/lowest of tea consumption group was regarded as the reference. Black square means value of RR, and the size of the square means inversely proportional to its variance. Horizontal line means 95% CI of RR. Black diamond means pooled results. The studies were ordered by published year.
Mentions: Random-effect model was used (Pheterogeneity=0.071, I2=27.0%). Overall, no statistically significant relationship between tea consumption and risk of T2DM was found according to 12 eligible studies (pooling RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.03, p=0.549). No statistically significant relationship was found in any stratified group, except for the comparison between the highest tea consumption (≥4 cups/day) group and the non-consumption/lowest consumption group (the reference). The corresponding RRs (95% CIs) and p values were 1.01 (0.96 to 1.06), 0.729 for <1 cup/day group versus the reference, 1.01 (0.97 to 1.05), 0.700 for 1–3 cup/day group versus the reference, and 0.84 (0.71 to 0.99), 0.036 for ≥4 cups/day group versus the reference, respectively (figure 2A).

Bottom Line: Tea consumption of ≥3 cups/day was associated with decreased T2DM risk in women (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.00).No obvious change was found in sensitivity analyses.The results suggest that daily tea consumption (≥3 cups/day) is associated with a lower T2DM risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus