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Tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis update.

Yang J, Mao QX, Xu HX, Ma X, Zeng CY - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Tea consumption of ≥3 cups/day was associated with decreased T2DM risk in women (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.00).No obvious change was found in sensitivity analyses.The results suggest that daily tea consumption (≥3 cups/day) is associated with a lower T2DM risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram describing search results of the systematic review (identification, screening eligibility, inclusion).
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BMJOPEN2014005632F1: Flow diagram describing search results of the systematic review (identification, screening eligibility, inclusion).

Mentions: The flow diagram of the procedure used to identify the relevant studies is shown in figure 1. A total of 519 potentially relevant papers were retrieved with the systematic search. Based on the predefined selection criteria, 499 articles were excluded for different reasons such as laboratory studies and reviews. Twenty potentially relevant studies were initially selected.16–2830–36 After the evaluation of the full texts, eight studies were excluded. One of them categorised tea consumption based on the frequency ‘time/day’ of drinking and did not assign the standard serving size as one cup,23 whereas another defined it in the volume (mL/day) of drinking24; two articles were excluded because the baseline of RR was <1 cup/day2131; three articles lacked sufficient details for inclusion in meta-analysis223033; one was also excluded because it was based on the nested case–control study.27 Thus, 12 studies were selected for the further analysis in this study.16–202526283234–36


Tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis update.

Yang J, Mao QX, Xu HX, Ma X, Zeng CY - BMJ Open (2014)

Flow diagram describing search results of the systematic review (identification, screening eligibility, inclusion).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120344&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005632F1: Flow diagram describing search results of the systematic review (identification, screening eligibility, inclusion).
Mentions: The flow diagram of the procedure used to identify the relevant studies is shown in figure 1. A total of 519 potentially relevant papers were retrieved with the systematic search. Based on the predefined selection criteria, 499 articles were excluded for different reasons such as laboratory studies and reviews. Twenty potentially relevant studies were initially selected.16–2830–36 After the evaluation of the full texts, eight studies were excluded. One of them categorised tea consumption based on the frequency ‘time/day’ of drinking and did not assign the standard serving size as one cup,23 whereas another defined it in the volume (mL/day) of drinking24; two articles were excluded because the baseline of RR was <1 cup/day2131; three articles lacked sufficient details for inclusion in meta-analysis223033; one was also excluded because it was based on the nested case–control study.27 Thus, 12 studies were selected for the further analysis in this study.16–202526283234–36

Bottom Line: Tea consumption of ≥3 cups/day was associated with decreased T2DM risk in women (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.00).No obvious change was found in sensitivity analyses.The results suggest that daily tea consumption (≥3 cups/day) is associated with a lower T2DM risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus