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Effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome criteria: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Blanco Mejia S, Kendall CW, Viguiliouk E, Augustin LS, Ha V, Cozma AI, Mirrahimi A, Maroleanu A, Chiavaroli L, Leiter LA, de Souza RJ, Jenkins DJ, Sievenpiper JL - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Tree nut interventions lowered triglycerides (MD=-0.06 mmol/L (95% CI -0.09 to -0.03 mmol/L)) and fasting blood glucose (MD=-0.08 mmol/L (95% CI -0.16 to -0.01 mmol/L)) compared with control diet interventions.There was no effect on waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or blood pressure with the direction of effect favouring tree nuts for waist circumference.There was evidence of significant unexplained heterogeneity in all analyses (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of tree nuts on triglycerides (TG). Pooled effect estimates are shown as diamonds, one each for trials conducted in otherwise healthy, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome criteria, type 2 diabetes mellitus and their combination (total). Paired analyses were applied to all cross-over trials (20) and one substudy. Data are expressed as mean differences with 95% CI, using generic inverse-variance random effects models. Interstudy heterogeneity was tested by using the Cochran Q statistic (Chi2) at a significance level of p<0.10 and quantified by the I2 statistic.
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BMJOPEN2013004660F2: Forest plot of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of tree nuts on triglycerides (TG). Pooled effect estimates are shown as diamonds, one each for trials conducted in otherwise healthy, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome criteria, type 2 diabetes mellitus and their combination (total). Paired analyses were applied to all cross-over trials (20) and one substudy. Data are expressed as mean differences with 95% CI, using generic inverse-variance random effects models. Interstudy heterogeneity was tested by using the Cochran Q statistic (Chi2) at a significance level of p<0.10 and quantified by the I2 statistic.

Mentions: Figure 2 presents data on the effect of tree nuts on triglycerides. Tree nuts showed a significant triglyceride-lowering effect (MD=−0.06 mmol/L (95% CI −0.09 to −0.03 mmol/L)) in the overall analysis with evidence of moderate heterogeneity (I2=34%, p=0.02). The same effect was seen with evidence of moderate heterogeneity (I2=42%, p=0.05) in the subsample of participants who were otherwise healthy (MD=−0.07 mmol/L (95% CI −0.11 to −0.04 mmol/L)). Although the reductions were not statistically significant in people with dyslipidaemia, MetS criteria or type 2 diabetes mellitus, they did not significantly differ from the reductions in participants who were otherwise healthy. Sensitivity analyses did not alter the results (data not shown).


Effect of tree nuts on metabolic syndrome criteria: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Blanco Mejia S, Kendall CW, Viguiliouk E, Augustin LS, Ha V, Cozma AI, Mirrahimi A, Maroleanu A, Chiavaroli L, Leiter LA, de Souza RJ, Jenkins DJ, Sievenpiper JL - BMJ Open (2014)

Forest plot of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of tree nuts on triglycerides (TG). Pooled effect estimates are shown as diamonds, one each for trials conducted in otherwise healthy, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome criteria, type 2 diabetes mellitus and their combination (total). Paired analyses were applied to all cross-over trials (20) and one substudy. Data are expressed as mean differences with 95% CI, using generic inverse-variance random effects models. Interstudy heterogeneity was tested by using the Cochran Q statistic (Chi2) at a significance level of p<0.10 and quantified by the I2 statistic.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120343&req=5

BMJOPEN2013004660F2: Forest plot of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of tree nuts on triglycerides (TG). Pooled effect estimates are shown as diamonds, one each for trials conducted in otherwise healthy, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome criteria, type 2 diabetes mellitus and their combination (total). Paired analyses were applied to all cross-over trials (20) and one substudy. Data are expressed as mean differences with 95% CI, using generic inverse-variance random effects models. Interstudy heterogeneity was tested by using the Cochran Q statistic (Chi2) at a significance level of p<0.10 and quantified by the I2 statistic.
Mentions: Figure 2 presents data on the effect of tree nuts on triglycerides. Tree nuts showed a significant triglyceride-lowering effect (MD=−0.06 mmol/L (95% CI −0.09 to −0.03 mmol/L)) in the overall analysis with evidence of moderate heterogeneity (I2=34%, p=0.02). The same effect was seen with evidence of moderate heterogeneity (I2=42%, p=0.05) in the subsample of participants who were otherwise healthy (MD=−0.07 mmol/L (95% CI −0.11 to −0.04 mmol/L)). Although the reductions were not statistically significant in people with dyslipidaemia, MetS criteria or type 2 diabetes mellitus, they did not significantly differ from the reductions in participants who were otherwise healthy. Sensitivity analyses did not alter the results (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Tree nut interventions lowered triglycerides (MD=-0.06 mmol/L (95% CI -0.09 to -0.03 mmol/L)) and fasting blood glucose (MD=-0.08 mmol/L (95% CI -0.16 to -0.01 mmol/L)) compared with control diet interventions.There was no effect on waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or blood pressure with the direction of effect favouring tree nuts for waist circumference.There was evidence of significant unexplained heterogeneity in all analyses (p<0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus