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Perceptions of chronically ill and healthy consumers about electronic personal health records: a comparative empirical investigation.

Cocosila M, Archer N - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Perceived usefulness was the key explanation of the intention to use PHRs for both ill and well people (total effect of 0.601 and 0.565, respectively) followed by security, privacy and trust in PHRs (total effect of 0.377 and 0.479, respectively).Conversely, computer anxiety was perceived as a significant barrier (total effect of -0.327 for ill individuals and -0.212 for well individuals).We found little difference in perceptions of electronic PHRs between chronically ill and well individuals, although self-reporting their health status might have influenced the results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Business, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Alberta, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Theoretical model of personal health record adoption.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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BMJOPEN2014005304F1: Theoretical model of personal health record adoption.

Mentions: The proposed constructs and their related hypotheses are shown in figure 1 in the form of a theoretical model of PHR adoption. The final endogenous construct of this model is behavioural intention to adopt PHRs that measures potential user intentions regarding this eHealth support tool.


Perceptions of chronically ill and healthy consumers about electronic personal health records: a comparative empirical investigation.

Cocosila M, Archer N - BMJ Open (2014)

Theoretical model of personal health record adoption.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120338&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005304F1: Theoretical model of personal health record adoption.
Mentions: The proposed constructs and their related hypotheses are shown in figure 1 in the form of a theoretical model of PHR adoption. The final endogenous construct of this model is behavioural intention to adopt PHRs that measures potential user intentions regarding this eHealth support tool.

Bottom Line: Perceived usefulness was the key explanation of the intention to use PHRs for both ill and well people (total effect of 0.601 and 0.565, respectively) followed by security, privacy and trust in PHRs (total effect of 0.377 and 0.479, respectively).Conversely, computer anxiety was perceived as a significant barrier (total effect of -0.327 for ill individuals and -0.212 for well individuals).We found little difference in perceptions of electronic PHRs between chronically ill and well individuals, although self-reporting their health status might have influenced the results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Business, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Alberta, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus