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Postnatal epigenetic modification of glucocorticoid receptor gene in preterm infants: a prospective cohort study.

Kantake M, Yoshitake H, Ishikawa H, Araki Y, Shimizu T - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Thus, the methylation rate was significantly higher in preterm than in term infants at postnatal day 4.Several perinatal parameters were significantly correlated with this change in the methylation rate.Although further large-scale studies are needed to detect the environmental factors that explain the difference in epigenetic modification among infants after birth, our data show that the postnatal environment influences epigenetic programming of GR expression through methylation of the GR gene promoter in premature infants, which may result in relative glucocorticoid insufficiency during the postnatal period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Perinatal Medical Center, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu, Chiba, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cross-sectional analysis of the methylation rates of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene promoter in leucocytes determined using the Mquant method. Percentage of methylation at each CpG site (mean±SEM) in the GR promoter isolated from peripheral blood collected at birth and on postnatal day 4 in term (dark grey bar) and preterm (light grey bar) infants, respectively. Mann–Whitney U tests were performed to compare the methylation rates in preterm and term infants at each CpG site. A p value <0.05 (two tailed) was considered statistically significant. Closed star symbol, methylation rate significantly higher in preterm compared with term infants; Open star symbol, methylation rate significantly lower in preterm compared with term infants.
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BMJOPEN2014005318F2: Cross-sectional analysis of the methylation rates of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene promoter in leucocytes determined using the Mquant method. Percentage of methylation at each CpG site (mean±SEM) in the GR promoter isolated from peripheral blood collected at birth and on postnatal day 4 in term (dark grey bar) and preterm (light grey bar) infants, respectively. Mann–Whitney U tests were performed to compare the methylation rates in preterm and term infants at each CpG site. A p value <0.05 (two tailed) was considered statistically significant. Closed star symbol, methylation rate significantly higher in preterm compared with term infants; Open star symbol, methylation rate significantly lower in preterm compared with term infants.

Mentions: Methylation rates in preterm infants at birth were lower at three CpG sites (1; p=0.033, 5; p=0.0024, 8; p=0.0001) and higher at one site (4; p=0.040) compared with those in term infants. Methylation rates on postnatal day 4 were significantly higher in preterm infants compared with term infants at seven CpG sites (15, p=0.00061; 16, p=0.0083; 21, p=0.043; 25, p=0.0098; 26, p=0.0050; 27, p=0.00040; 28, p=0.038). Methylation rates in preterm infants were not lower than those of term infants at any CpG site (figure 2).


Postnatal epigenetic modification of glucocorticoid receptor gene in preterm infants: a prospective cohort study.

Kantake M, Yoshitake H, Ishikawa H, Araki Y, Shimizu T - BMJ Open (2014)

Cross-sectional analysis of the methylation rates of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene promoter in leucocytes determined using the Mquant method. Percentage of methylation at each CpG site (mean±SEM) in the GR promoter isolated from peripheral blood collected at birth and on postnatal day 4 in term (dark grey bar) and preterm (light grey bar) infants, respectively. Mann–Whitney U tests were performed to compare the methylation rates in preterm and term infants at each CpG site. A p value <0.05 (two tailed) was considered statistically significant. Closed star symbol, methylation rate significantly higher in preterm compared with term infants; Open star symbol, methylation rate significantly lower in preterm compared with term infants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120337&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005318F2: Cross-sectional analysis of the methylation rates of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene promoter in leucocytes determined using the Mquant method. Percentage of methylation at each CpG site (mean±SEM) in the GR promoter isolated from peripheral blood collected at birth and on postnatal day 4 in term (dark grey bar) and preterm (light grey bar) infants, respectively. Mann–Whitney U tests were performed to compare the methylation rates in preterm and term infants at each CpG site. A p value <0.05 (two tailed) was considered statistically significant. Closed star symbol, methylation rate significantly higher in preterm compared with term infants; Open star symbol, methylation rate significantly lower in preterm compared with term infants.
Mentions: Methylation rates in preterm infants at birth were lower at three CpG sites (1; p=0.033, 5; p=0.0024, 8; p=0.0001) and higher at one site (4; p=0.040) compared with those in term infants. Methylation rates on postnatal day 4 were significantly higher in preterm infants compared with term infants at seven CpG sites (15, p=0.00061; 16, p=0.0083; 21, p=0.043; 25, p=0.0098; 26, p=0.0050; 27, p=0.00040; 28, p=0.038). Methylation rates in preterm infants were not lower than those of term infants at any CpG site (figure 2).

Bottom Line: Thus, the methylation rate was significantly higher in preterm than in term infants at postnatal day 4.Several perinatal parameters were significantly correlated with this change in the methylation rate.Although further large-scale studies are needed to detect the environmental factors that explain the difference in epigenetic modification among infants after birth, our data show that the postnatal environment influences epigenetic programming of GR expression through methylation of the GR gene promoter in premature infants, which may result in relative glucocorticoid insufficiency during the postnatal period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Perinatal Medical Center, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Urayasu, Chiba, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus