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Examining different measures of multimorbidity, using a large prospective cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.

Harrison C, Britt H, Miller G, Henderson J - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Australian general practice. 8707 random consenting deidentified patient encounters with 290 randomly selected general practitioners.Prevalence estimates of multimorbidity using different definitions.Data classified to ICPC-2 chapters, ICD-10 chapters or CIRS domains produce similar multimorbidity prevalence estimates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Family Medicine Research Centre, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient age-specific prevalence of ‘multimorbidity’ (ICPC, International Classification of Primary Care).
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BMJOPEN2013004694F3: Patient age-specific prevalence of ‘multimorbidity’ (ICPC, International Classification of Primary Care).

Mentions: Figure 3 shows the age-specific multimorbidity prevalence estimates using the 2+ and 3+ definitions by individual chronic conditions and ICPC-2 chapters. Only the ICPC-2 chapters are presented as we have demonstrated that there was no significant difference between estimates derived using ICPC-2 chapters, ICD-10 chapters or CIRS domains. The age-specific prevalence using 2+ individual chronic conditions and 2+ ICPC-2 chapters increased rapidly up to the 70–79 years age group, and remained steady in the older age groups. Compared with 2+, the increase in prevalence started later for 3+ individual chronic conditions (between 20–29 and 30–39 years of age). For 3+ ICPC-2 chapters, this increase started even later (between 30–39 and 40–49 years of age). For both the 3+ measures, the prevalence did not plateau until 80–89 years of age, 10 years later than when using the 2+ definition.


Examining different measures of multimorbidity, using a large prospective cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.

Harrison C, Britt H, Miller G, Henderson J - BMJ Open (2014)

Patient age-specific prevalence of ‘multimorbidity’ (ICPC, International Classification of Primary Care).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120329&req=5

BMJOPEN2013004694F3: Patient age-specific prevalence of ‘multimorbidity’ (ICPC, International Classification of Primary Care).
Mentions: Figure 3 shows the age-specific multimorbidity prevalence estimates using the 2+ and 3+ definitions by individual chronic conditions and ICPC-2 chapters. Only the ICPC-2 chapters are presented as we have demonstrated that there was no significant difference between estimates derived using ICPC-2 chapters, ICD-10 chapters or CIRS domains. The age-specific prevalence using 2+ individual chronic conditions and 2+ ICPC-2 chapters increased rapidly up to the 70–79 years age group, and remained steady in the older age groups. Compared with 2+, the increase in prevalence started later for 3+ individual chronic conditions (between 20–29 and 30–39 years of age). For 3+ ICPC-2 chapters, this increase started even later (between 30–39 and 40–49 years of age). For both the 3+ measures, the prevalence did not plateau until 80–89 years of age, 10 years later than when using the 2+ definition.

Bottom Line: Australian general practice. 8707 random consenting deidentified patient encounters with 290 randomly selected general practitioners.Prevalence estimates of multimorbidity using different definitions.Data classified to ICPC-2 chapters, ICD-10 chapters or CIRS domains produce similar multimorbidity prevalence estimates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Family Medicine Research Centre, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus