Limits...
'This isn't what mine looked like': a qualitative study of symptom appraisal and help seeking in people recently diagnosed with melanoma.

Walter FM, Birt L, Cavers D, Scott S, Emery J, Burrows N, Cavanagh G, MacKie R, Weller D, Campbell C - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Many included unassuming features such as 'just a little spot' as well as common features of changes in size, colour and shape.Most decisions to seek help were triggered by common factors such as advice from family and friends. 11 patients reported previous reassurance about their skin changes by a HCP, with little guidance on monitoring change or when it would be appropriate to re-consult.The importance of appropriate advice, monitoring and safety-netting procedures by HCPs for people presenting with skin changes is also highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Primary Care Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK General Practice and Primary Care Academic Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Model of Pathways to Treatment (HCP, healthcare professional).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120305&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005566F1: Model of Pathways to Treatment (HCP, healthcare professional).

Mentions: Interviews were undertaken between January 2012 and January 2013. In each area an experienced researcher used a semistructured approach with an interview schedule informed from the literature,1415 our collective expertise from interviewing patients recently diagnosed with other cancers,16 and a pilot study (n=17, conducted during the early stages of the study, and including patients interviewed >10 weeks post-diagnosis (n=12), or with melanoma histology which did not fit the inclusion criteria (n=5, Breslow thickness 1–2 mm or indeterminate)). The theoretical approach of the Model of Pathways to Treatment1718 (figure 1) was used to underpin the interview schedule, exploring the processes that occurred within each time interval and focusing on: how initial symptoms were noticed; personal risk perceptions; the language used to describe symptoms and changes over time; the participant's decision-making and triggers to help seeking; and the experience of the diagnostic process of primary and secondary care from the patient perspective. A calendar-landmarking technique19 was used as an adjunct to the interviews, to establish the timing and details of events which led to the melanoma diagnosis, together with diaries and letters that participants referred to during this process. Participants were also invited to make a pencil drawing/s of their skin cancer as it developed; ongoing analyses are examining perceptions of lesions over time and comparing the drawings with clinical images. At the end of each interview, participants completed a short questionnaire to provide demographic data and information about their skin and hair colour and their skin's response to ultraviolet (UV) light using the widely validated Fitzpatrick Scale.20


'This isn't what mine looked like': a qualitative study of symptom appraisal and help seeking in people recently diagnosed with melanoma.

Walter FM, Birt L, Cavers D, Scott S, Emery J, Burrows N, Cavanagh G, MacKie R, Weller D, Campbell C - BMJ Open (2014)

Model of Pathways to Treatment (HCP, healthcare professional).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4120305&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005566F1: Model of Pathways to Treatment (HCP, healthcare professional).
Mentions: Interviews were undertaken between January 2012 and January 2013. In each area an experienced researcher used a semistructured approach with an interview schedule informed from the literature,1415 our collective expertise from interviewing patients recently diagnosed with other cancers,16 and a pilot study (n=17, conducted during the early stages of the study, and including patients interviewed >10 weeks post-diagnosis (n=12), or with melanoma histology which did not fit the inclusion criteria (n=5, Breslow thickness 1–2 mm or indeterminate)). The theoretical approach of the Model of Pathways to Treatment1718 (figure 1) was used to underpin the interview schedule, exploring the processes that occurred within each time interval and focusing on: how initial symptoms were noticed; personal risk perceptions; the language used to describe symptoms and changes over time; the participant's decision-making and triggers to help seeking; and the experience of the diagnostic process of primary and secondary care from the patient perspective. A calendar-landmarking technique19 was used as an adjunct to the interviews, to establish the timing and details of events which led to the melanoma diagnosis, together with diaries and letters that participants referred to during this process. Participants were also invited to make a pencil drawing/s of their skin cancer as it developed; ongoing analyses are examining perceptions of lesions over time and comparing the drawings with clinical images. At the end of each interview, participants completed a short questionnaire to provide demographic data and information about their skin and hair colour and their skin's response to ultraviolet (UV) light using the widely validated Fitzpatrick Scale.20

Bottom Line: Many included unassuming features such as 'just a little spot' as well as common features of changes in size, colour and shape.Most decisions to seek help were triggered by common factors such as advice from family and friends. 11 patients reported previous reassurance about their skin changes by a HCP, with little guidance on monitoring change or when it would be appropriate to re-consult.The importance of appropriate advice, monitoring and safety-netting procedures by HCPs for people presenting with skin changes is also highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Primary Care Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK General Practice and Primary Care Academic Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus