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Changes in behavior and in brain glucose metabolism in rats after nine weeks on a high fat diet: a randomized controlled trial.

Hu H, Xu Y, Liu C, Zhao H, Zhang H, Wang L - Shanghai Arch Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: In the HFD group the magnitude of the drop in the sucrose preference was strongly correlated to the magnitude of the deactivation of the right thalamus (r=0.78) and the right striatum (r=0.81).Further work is needed to clarify the underling mechanism, but it appears that the interaction between the content of the diet and the limbic system-striatum-thalamus circuit plays a role in both eating behavior and depressive symptoms.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China ; Department of Psychiatry, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: A high-fat diet (HFD) is a well-known risk factor for cardio-cerebrovascular disease but the relationship between a HFD and depressive symptoms remains unknown.

Objective: Compare changes in behavioral and measures of brain glucose metabolism in rats fed a HFD to those of rats fed a standard diet.

Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a study group (n=10) that received a high fat diet for 9 weeks or a control group (n=10) that received a standard diet for 9 weeks. At baseline and at the end of the 9-week trial assessments included body weight, serum lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), the sucrose preference test, and the open field test. The rate of brain glucose metabolism in different brain regions (assessed using micro-positron emission tomography) at the end of the trial was also compared between the two groups of rats.

Results: Nine weeks of a HFD in rats resulted in the expected increase in weight and changes in serum lipid levels, but it was also associated with a decreased preference for sucrose (which may be due to a loss of interest in pleasurable activities), increased weight-adjusted water intake, and a significant deactivation of the right thalamus and right striatum (based on decreased rates of glucose metabolism). In the HFD group the magnitude of the drop in the sucrose preference was strongly correlated to the magnitude of the deactivation of the right thalamus (r=0.78) and the right striatum (r=0.81).

Conclusions: These findings support hypotheses about the role of a HFD in the causal pathway for depressive symptoms. Further work is needed to clarify the underling mechanism, but it appears that the interaction between the content of the diet and the limbic system-striatum-thalamus circuit plays a role in both eating behavior and depressive symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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sap-26-03-129-g002.tif: Flow chart of the study

Mentions: All procedures complied with Fudan University experimental standards and the NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. The flowchart for the study is shown in Figure 1. Twenty healthy male Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 180-200 g (about 2-3 months of age) were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats each. Rats in the control group were fed a regular diet (choline bitartrate 0.25%, vitamin mixture 1.0%, mineral mixture 3.5%, corn oil 5.0%, cellulose 5.0%, casein 20.0%, and corn α-starch to make 100%) for 9 weeks. Rats in the experimental group were fed a HFD (custard powder 10%, lard 20%, cholesterol 2.5%, sodium cholate 0.2%, thiamazole 0.1%, sucrose 2% and regular diet 65.2%) for 9 weeks.[11]


Changes in behavior and in brain glucose metabolism in rats after nine weeks on a high fat diet: a randomized controlled trial.

Hu H, Xu Y, Liu C, Zhao H, Zhang H, Wang L - Shanghai Arch Psychiatry (2014)

Flow chart of the study
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4118009&req=5

sap-26-03-129-g002.tif: Flow chart of the study
Mentions: All procedures complied with Fudan University experimental standards and the NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. The flowchart for the study is shown in Figure 1. Twenty healthy male Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 180-200 g (about 2-3 months of age) were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats each. Rats in the control group were fed a regular diet (choline bitartrate 0.25%, vitamin mixture 1.0%, mineral mixture 3.5%, corn oil 5.0%, cellulose 5.0%, casein 20.0%, and corn α-starch to make 100%) for 9 weeks. Rats in the experimental group were fed a HFD (custard powder 10%, lard 20%, cholesterol 2.5%, sodium cholate 0.2%, thiamazole 0.1%, sucrose 2% and regular diet 65.2%) for 9 weeks.[11]

Bottom Line: In the HFD group the magnitude of the drop in the sucrose preference was strongly correlated to the magnitude of the deactivation of the right thalamus (r=0.78) and the right striatum (r=0.81).Further work is needed to clarify the underling mechanism, but it appears that the interaction between the content of the diet and the limbic system-striatum-thalamus circuit plays a role in both eating behavior and depressive symptoms.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China ; Department of Psychiatry, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: A high-fat diet (HFD) is a well-known risk factor for cardio-cerebrovascular disease but the relationship between a HFD and depressive symptoms remains unknown.

Objective: Compare changes in behavioral and measures of brain glucose metabolism in rats fed a HFD to those of rats fed a standard diet.

Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a study group (n=10) that received a high fat diet for 9 weeks or a control group (n=10) that received a standard diet for 9 weeks. At baseline and at the end of the 9-week trial assessments included body weight, serum lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), the sucrose preference test, and the open field test. The rate of brain glucose metabolism in different brain regions (assessed using micro-positron emission tomography) at the end of the trial was also compared between the two groups of rats.

Results: Nine weeks of a HFD in rats resulted in the expected increase in weight and changes in serum lipid levels, but it was also associated with a decreased preference for sucrose (which may be due to a loss of interest in pleasurable activities), increased weight-adjusted water intake, and a significant deactivation of the right thalamus and right striatum (based on decreased rates of glucose metabolism). In the HFD group the magnitude of the drop in the sucrose preference was strongly correlated to the magnitude of the deactivation of the right thalamus (r=0.78) and the right striatum (r=0.81).

Conclusions: These findings support hypotheses about the role of a HFD in the causal pathway for depressive symptoms. Further work is needed to clarify the underling mechanism, but it appears that the interaction between the content of the diet and the limbic system-striatum-thalamus circuit plays a role in both eating behavior and depressive symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus