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Longitudinal change in sleep and daytime sleepiness in postpartum women.

Filtness AJ, MacKenzie J, Armstrong K - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Although repeated measures analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the amount of nocturnal sleep and frequency of night-time wakings, there was a significant reduction in sleep disruption, due to fewer minutes of wake after sleep onset.Subjective sleepiness was measured each day using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale; at the two earlier time points this was significantly correlated with sleep quality but not to sleep quantity.Epworth Sleepiness Scores significantly reduced over time; however, during week 18 over 50% of participants were still experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score ≥12).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety - Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Sleep disruption strongly influences daytime functioning; resultant sleepiness is recognised as a contributing risk-factor for individuals performing critical and dangerous tasks. While the relationship between sleep and sleepiness has been heavily investigated in the vulnerable sub-populations of shift workers and patients with sleep disorders, postpartum women have been comparatively overlooked. Thirty-three healthy, postpartum women recorded every episode of sleep and wake each day during postpartum weeks 6, 12 and 18. Although repeated measures analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the amount of nocturnal sleep and frequency of night-time wakings, there was a significant reduction in sleep disruption, due to fewer minutes of wake after sleep onset. Subjective sleepiness was measured each day using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale; at the two earlier time points this was significantly correlated with sleep quality but not to sleep quantity. Epworth Sleepiness Scores significantly reduced over time; however, during week 18 over 50% of participants were still experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score ≥12). Results have implications for health care providers and policy makers. Health care providers designing interventions to address sleepiness in new mothers should take into account the dynamic changes to sleep and sleepiness during this initial postpartum period. Policy makers developing regulations for parental leave entitlements should take into consideration the high prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness experienced by new mothers, ensuring enough opportunity for daytime sleepiness to diminish to a manageable level prior to reengagement in the workforce.

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Postpartum daytime sleepiness, KSS score on waking, error bars represent standard error.
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pone-0103513-g002: Postpartum daytime sleepiness, KSS score on waking, error bars represent standard error.

Mentions: Three participants failed to complete the KSS consistently at each time point; consequently KSS results are presented for 30 participants only. Figure 2 presents the effect of time on KSS. There was a significant main effect of time on KSS [F(2, 58) = 5.090, p = .009, partial η2 = .149]. Pairwise comparison identified waking sleepiness experienced at 18 weeks [mean = 5.36, SE = 0.27] to be significantly lower than waking sleepiness experienced at 12 weeks [mean = 6.01, SE = 0.20, p = .019]. Accordingly, the proportion of participants reporting feeling sleepy when they woke (KSS ≥6) was similar for Week 6 (54.55%) and Week 12 (57.58%), and then reduced in Week 18 (30.30%).


Longitudinal change in sleep and daytime sleepiness in postpartum women.

Filtness AJ, MacKenzie J, Armstrong K - PLoS ONE (2014)

Postpartum daytime sleepiness, KSS score on waking, error bars represent standard error.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4117520&req=5

pone-0103513-g002: Postpartum daytime sleepiness, KSS score on waking, error bars represent standard error.
Mentions: Three participants failed to complete the KSS consistently at each time point; consequently KSS results are presented for 30 participants only. Figure 2 presents the effect of time on KSS. There was a significant main effect of time on KSS [F(2, 58) = 5.090, p = .009, partial η2 = .149]. Pairwise comparison identified waking sleepiness experienced at 18 weeks [mean = 5.36, SE = 0.27] to be significantly lower than waking sleepiness experienced at 12 weeks [mean = 6.01, SE = 0.20, p = .019]. Accordingly, the proportion of participants reporting feeling sleepy when they woke (KSS ≥6) was similar for Week 6 (54.55%) and Week 12 (57.58%), and then reduced in Week 18 (30.30%).

Bottom Line: Although repeated measures analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the amount of nocturnal sleep and frequency of night-time wakings, there was a significant reduction in sleep disruption, due to fewer minutes of wake after sleep onset.Subjective sleepiness was measured each day using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale; at the two earlier time points this was significantly correlated with sleep quality but not to sleep quantity.Epworth Sleepiness Scores significantly reduced over time; however, during week 18 over 50% of participants were still experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score ≥12).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety - Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Sleep disruption strongly influences daytime functioning; resultant sleepiness is recognised as a contributing risk-factor for individuals performing critical and dangerous tasks. While the relationship between sleep and sleepiness has been heavily investigated in the vulnerable sub-populations of shift workers and patients with sleep disorders, postpartum women have been comparatively overlooked. Thirty-three healthy, postpartum women recorded every episode of sleep and wake each day during postpartum weeks 6, 12 and 18. Although repeated measures analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the amount of nocturnal sleep and frequency of night-time wakings, there was a significant reduction in sleep disruption, due to fewer minutes of wake after sleep onset. Subjective sleepiness was measured each day using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale; at the two earlier time points this was significantly correlated with sleep quality but not to sleep quantity. Epworth Sleepiness Scores significantly reduced over time; however, during week 18 over 50% of participants were still experiencing excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score ≥12). Results have implications for health care providers and policy makers. Health care providers designing interventions to address sleepiness in new mothers should take into account the dynamic changes to sleep and sleepiness during this initial postpartum period. Policy makers developing regulations for parental leave entitlements should take into consideration the high prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness experienced by new mothers, ensuring enough opportunity for daytime sleepiness to diminish to a manageable level prior to reengagement in the workforce.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus