Limits...
Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring.

Gribble KE, Jarvis G, Bock M, Mark Welch DB - Aging Cell (2014)

Bottom Line: With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased.Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age.Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 02543, USA.

Show MeSH
Kaplan–Meier survival curves for Brachionus manjavacas mothers and their offspring. Top, amictic mothers (left) and mictic mothers (right) fed at 100% or 10% of ad libitum levels or under intermittent fasting (IF). Lower curves, female (left) and male (right) offspring of 3-day-, 5-day-, or 7-day-old mothers under the indicated CR regimen. * indicates significant difference between CR treatment and 100% ad libitum feeding of maternal females (P < 0.05, Mantel–Cox test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4116445&req=5

fig01: Kaplan–Meier survival curves for Brachionus manjavacas mothers and their offspring. Top, amictic mothers (left) and mictic mothers (right) fed at 100% or 10% of ad libitum levels or under intermittent fasting (IF). Lower curves, female (left) and male (right) offspring of 3-day-, 5-day-, or 7-day-old mothers under the indicated CR regimen. * indicates significant difference between CR treatment and 100% ad libitum feeding of maternal females (P < 0.05, Mantel–Cox test).

Mentions: We subjected mothers to either chronic caloric restriction (CCR) at 10% of ad libitum (AL) food levels (a 90% reduction in food) or to IF by feeding AL and starving on alternate days using standard protocols (see Experimental procedures for specifics). All offspring fed at AL food levels. For both amictic and mictic mothers, 10% CCR and IF significantly changed the shape of the survival curves (Fig. 1), and mean life span was significantly increased (Fig. 2), consistent with previous results (Gribble & Mark Welch, 2013). The largest change in mean life span was for mictic IF mothers, from 8.0 days under AL conditions to 14.6 days under IF an increase of 83%. Maximum life span (95th percentile) increased under CR, except for amictic mothers under 10% CCR [Fig. 2, Table S1 (Supporting information)].


Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring.

Gribble KE, Jarvis G, Bock M, Mark Welch DB - Aging Cell (2014)

Kaplan–Meier survival curves for Brachionus manjavacas mothers and their offspring. Top, amictic mothers (left) and mictic mothers (right) fed at 100% or 10% of ad libitum levels or under intermittent fasting (IF). Lower curves, female (left) and male (right) offspring of 3-day-, 5-day-, or 7-day-old mothers under the indicated CR regimen. * indicates significant difference between CR treatment and 100% ad libitum feeding of maternal females (P < 0.05, Mantel–Cox test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4116445&req=5

fig01: Kaplan–Meier survival curves for Brachionus manjavacas mothers and their offspring. Top, amictic mothers (left) and mictic mothers (right) fed at 100% or 10% of ad libitum levels or under intermittent fasting (IF). Lower curves, female (left) and male (right) offspring of 3-day-, 5-day-, or 7-day-old mothers under the indicated CR regimen. * indicates significant difference between CR treatment and 100% ad libitum feeding of maternal females (P < 0.05, Mantel–Cox test).
Mentions: We subjected mothers to either chronic caloric restriction (CCR) at 10% of ad libitum (AL) food levels (a 90% reduction in food) or to IF by feeding AL and starving on alternate days using standard protocols (see Experimental procedures for specifics). All offspring fed at AL food levels. For both amictic and mictic mothers, 10% CCR and IF significantly changed the shape of the survival curves (Fig. 1), and mean life span was significantly increased (Fig. 2), consistent with previous results (Gribble & Mark Welch, 2013). The largest change in mean life span was for mictic IF mothers, from 8.0 days under AL conditions to 14.6 days under IF an increase of 83%. Maximum life span (95th percentile) increased under CR, except for amictic mothers under 10% CCR [Fig. 2, Table S1 (Supporting information)].

Bottom Line: With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased.Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age.Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 02543, USA.

Show MeSH