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Brain susceptibility weighted imaging signal changes in acute hemorrhagic anemia: an experimental study using a rabbit model.

Xia J, Xie N, Feng Y, Yin A, Liu P, Zhou R, Lin F, Teng G, Lei Y - Med. Sci. Monit. (2014)

Bottom Line: Repeated bloodletting was associated with significant reductions in red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, pH, and PaCO2, and elevations of blood lactate and PaO2.Repeated bloodletting (5 occasions) caused significant (P<0.05) decreases in the SWI signals of the frontal cortex (from 63.10±22.82 to 37.70±4.32), temporal lobe (from 52.50±20.29 to 42.60±5.54), and thalamus (from 60.40±20.29 to 39.40±3.47), but was without effect in the frontal white matter.The effect of hemorrhage on the brain is reflected by SWI signal changes in the cerebral cortex and gray matter nuclei.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rodiology, Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen City, First Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China (mainland).

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) signal changes in different brain regions in a rabbit model of acute hemorrhagic anemia.

Material/methods: Ten New Zealand white rabbits were used for construction of the model of acute hemorrhagic anemia. Signal intensities of SWI images of the bilateral frontal cortex, frontal white matter, temporal lobe, and thalamic nuclei were measured. In addition, the cerebral gray-white contrast and venous structures of the SWI images were evaluated by an experienced physician.

Results: Repeated bloodletting was associated with significant reductions in red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, pH, and PaCO2, and elevations of blood lactate and PaO2. In normal status, the SWI signal intensity was significantly higher in the frontal cortex than in the frontal white matter (63.10±22.82 vs. 52.50±20.29; P<0.05). Repeated bloodletting (5 occasions) caused significant (P<0.05) decreases in the SWI signals of the frontal cortex (from 63.10±22.82 to 37.70±4.32), temporal lobe (from 52.50±20.29 to 42.60±5.54), and thalamus (from 60.40±20.29 to 39.40±3.47), but was without effect in the frontal white matter. The cerebral white-gray contrast and venous structures were clearer after bloodletting than before bloodletting.

Conclusions: The effect of hemorrhage on the brain is reflected by SWI signal changes in the cerebral cortex and gray matter nuclei.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The effects of repeated bloodletting on the results of whole blood tests, blood gas analyses, mean arterial pressure, and central venous pressure. (A) Repeated bloodletting was associated with progressive reductions in red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (HGB), and hematocrit (HCT%). (B) Repeated blood loss resulted in an increase in blood lactic acid concentration and a decrease in pH. (C) Bloodletting resulted in a progressive increase in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and a progressive decrease in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). (D) Blood loss was not associated with changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or central venous pressure (CVP). Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation, * P<0.05.
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f1-medscimonit-20-1291: The effects of repeated bloodletting on the results of whole blood tests, blood gas analyses, mean arterial pressure, and central venous pressure. (A) Repeated bloodletting was associated with progressive reductions in red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (HGB), and hematocrit (HCT%). (B) Repeated blood loss resulted in an increase in blood lactic acid concentration and a decrease in pH. (C) Bloodletting resulted in a progressive increase in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and a progressive decrease in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). (D) Blood loss was not associated with changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or central venous pressure (CVP). Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation, * P<0.05.

Mentions: Comparisons of the blood test results before and after bloodletting are shown in Figure 1. There was an approximate halving of the RBC, HGB and HCT% values after the first bloodletting, with further progressive decreases in the values of these parameters following each of the 4 subsequent bloodletting procedures (Figure 1A). The RBC, HGB, and HCT% values after the fifth bloodletting (4.72±0.43×1012/L, 98.20±10.22 g/L and 32.54±3.88%, respectively) were significantly lower than the corresponding control (pre-bleed) values (0.27±0.11×1012/L, 6.01±2.31 g/L and 1.97±1.02%, respectively). The bloodletting procedures were associated with substantial increases in lactic acid concentration as well as a small, but statistically significant, change in blood pH (Figure 1B). After the fifth bloodletting, the lactic acid concentration rose to 14.47±6.30 compared to 3.60±2.48 at pre-bleed. The pH value was decreased from 7.4±0.06 of pre-bleed to 7.25±0.01. PaO2 increased and PaCO2 decreased progressively with each bloodletting procedure (Figure 1C), such that following the fifth bloodletting, PaO2 was significantly elevated (150.40±9.78 vs. 80.53±19.24 mmHg) and PaCO2 was significantly reduced (22.00±7.35 vs. 42.65±4.13 mmHg) compared with the corresponding pre-bleed values. Bloodletting was not associated with any changes in CVP or MAP (Figure 1D). These results suggest the successful construction of acute hemorrhagic anemia in experimental rabbits.


Brain susceptibility weighted imaging signal changes in acute hemorrhagic anemia: an experimental study using a rabbit model.

Xia J, Xie N, Feng Y, Yin A, Liu P, Zhou R, Lin F, Teng G, Lei Y - Med. Sci. Monit. (2014)

The effects of repeated bloodletting on the results of whole blood tests, blood gas analyses, mean arterial pressure, and central venous pressure. (A) Repeated bloodletting was associated with progressive reductions in red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (HGB), and hematocrit (HCT%). (B) Repeated blood loss resulted in an increase in blood lactic acid concentration and a decrease in pH. (C) Bloodletting resulted in a progressive increase in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and a progressive decrease in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). (D) Blood loss was not associated with changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or central venous pressure (CVP). Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation, * P<0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4116343&req=5

f1-medscimonit-20-1291: The effects of repeated bloodletting on the results of whole blood tests, blood gas analyses, mean arterial pressure, and central venous pressure. (A) Repeated bloodletting was associated with progressive reductions in red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (HGB), and hematocrit (HCT%). (B) Repeated blood loss resulted in an increase in blood lactic acid concentration and a decrease in pH. (C) Bloodletting resulted in a progressive increase in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and a progressive decrease in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). (D) Blood loss was not associated with changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or central venous pressure (CVP). Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation, * P<0.05.
Mentions: Comparisons of the blood test results before and after bloodletting are shown in Figure 1. There was an approximate halving of the RBC, HGB and HCT% values after the first bloodletting, with further progressive decreases in the values of these parameters following each of the 4 subsequent bloodletting procedures (Figure 1A). The RBC, HGB, and HCT% values after the fifth bloodletting (4.72±0.43×1012/L, 98.20±10.22 g/L and 32.54±3.88%, respectively) were significantly lower than the corresponding control (pre-bleed) values (0.27±0.11×1012/L, 6.01±2.31 g/L and 1.97±1.02%, respectively). The bloodletting procedures were associated with substantial increases in lactic acid concentration as well as a small, but statistically significant, change in blood pH (Figure 1B). After the fifth bloodletting, the lactic acid concentration rose to 14.47±6.30 compared to 3.60±2.48 at pre-bleed. The pH value was decreased from 7.4±0.06 of pre-bleed to 7.25±0.01. PaO2 increased and PaCO2 decreased progressively with each bloodletting procedure (Figure 1C), such that following the fifth bloodletting, PaO2 was significantly elevated (150.40±9.78 vs. 80.53±19.24 mmHg) and PaCO2 was significantly reduced (22.00±7.35 vs. 42.65±4.13 mmHg) compared with the corresponding pre-bleed values. Bloodletting was not associated with any changes in CVP or MAP (Figure 1D). These results suggest the successful construction of acute hemorrhagic anemia in experimental rabbits.

Bottom Line: Repeated bloodletting was associated with significant reductions in red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, pH, and PaCO2, and elevations of blood lactate and PaO2.Repeated bloodletting (5 occasions) caused significant (P<0.05) decreases in the SWI signals of the frontal cortex (from 63.10±22.82 to 37.70±4.32), temporal lobe (from 52.50±20.29 to 42.60±5.54), and thalamus (from 60.40±20.29 to 39.40±3.47), but was without effect in the frontal white matter.The effect of hemorrhage on the brain is reflected by SWI signal changes in the cerebral cortex and gray matter nuclei.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rodiology, Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen City, First Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China (mainland).

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) signal changes in different brain regions in a rabbit model of acute hemorrhagic anemia.

Material/methods: Ten New Zealand white rabbits were used for construction of the model of acute hemorrhagic anemia. Signal intensities of SWI images of the bilateral frontal cortex, frontal white matter, temporal lobe, and thalamic nuclei were measured. In addition, the cerebral gray-white contrast and venous structures of the SWI images were evaluated by an experienced physician.

Results: Repeated bloodletting was associated with significant reductions in red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, pH, and PaCO2, and elevations of blood lactate and PaO2. In normal status, the SWI signal intensity was significantly higher in the frontal cortex than in the frontal white matter (63.10±22.82 vs. 52.50±20.29; P<0.05). Repeated bloodletting (5 occasions) caused significant (P<0.05) decreases in the SWI signals of the frontal cortex (from 63.10±22.82 to 37.70±4.32), temporal lobe (from 52.50±20.29 to 42.60±5.54), and thalamus (from 60.40±20.29 to 39.40±3.47), but was without effect in the frontal white matter. The cerebral white-gray contrast and venous structures were clearer after bloodletting than before bloodletting.

Conclusions: The effect of hemorrhage on the brain is reflected by SWI signal changes in the cerebral cortex and gray matter nuclei.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus