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Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle.

Goto Y, Jono Y, Hatanaka R, Nomura Y, Tani K, Chujo Y, Hiraoka K - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements.Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement.MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Osaka Prefecture University Habikino, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Averaged H-reflex from a representative subject (A), overall averages of M-wave amplitude (B) and H-reflex (C). The black trace indicates H-reflex in the discrete movement condition, the red trace indicates H-reflex in the R-1st condition, and the blue trace indicates H-reflex in the R-10th condition (A). Note that the amplitudes of the H-reflex are similar for all conditions. Bars indicate mean and error bars indicate standard error of mean (B,C).
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Figure 5: Averaged H-reflex from a representative subject (A), overall averages of M-wave amplitude (B) and H-reflex (C). The black trace indicates H-reflex in the discrete movement condition, the red trace indicates H-reflex in the R-1st condition, and the blue trace indicates H-reflex in the R-10th condition (A). Note that the amplitudes of the H-reflex are similar for all conditions. Bars indicate mean and error bars indicate standard error of mean (B,C).

Mentions: The M-wave amplitude was 7.2 ± 0.6% of Mmax (Figures 5A,B), and was not significantly different among the three experimental conditions (p = 0.067). The H-reflex amplitude was 23.8 ± 2.7% of Mmax (Figures 5A,C), and was not significantly different among the three experimental conditions (p = 0.273).


Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle.

Goto Y, Jono Y, Hatanaka R, Nomura Y, Tani K, Chujo Y, Hiraoka K - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Averaged H-reflex from a representative subject (A), overall averages of M-wave amplitude (B) and H-reflex (C). The black trace indicates H-reflex in the discrete movement condition, the red trace indicates H-reflex in the R-1st condition, and the blue trace indicates H-reflex in the R-10th condition (A). Note that the amplitudes of the H-reflex are similar for all conditions. Bars indicate mean and error bars indicate standard error of mean (B,C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4115592&req=5

Figure 5: Averaged H-reflex from a representative subject (A), overall averages of M-wave amplitude (B) and H-reflex (C). The black trace indicates H-reflex in the discrete movement condition, the red trace indicates H-reflex in the R-1st condition, and the blue trace indicates H-reflex in the R-10th condition (A). Note that the amplitudes of the H-reflex are similar for all conditions. Bars indicate mean and error bars indicate standard error of mean (B,C).
Mentions: The M-wave amplitude was 7.2 ± 0.6% of Mmax (Figures 5A,B), and was not significantly different among the three experimental conditions (p = 0.067). The H-reflex amplitude was 23.8 ± 2.7% of Mmax (Figures 5A,C), and was not significantly different among the three experimental conditions (p = 0.273).

Bottom Line: We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements.Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement.MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Osaka Prefecture University Habikino, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus