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Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle.

Goto Y, Jono Y, Hatanaka R, Nomura Y, Tani K, Chujo Y, Hiraoka K - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements.Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement.MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Osaka Prefecture University Habikino, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cartoon diagram of the experimental setup. Gray squares indicate bands bracing the thigh and thin to the table. The right knee is in the semiflexed position by placing the thigh and shin over the sandbags.
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Figure 1: Cartoon diagram of the experimental setup. Gray squares indicate bands bracing the thigh and thin to the table. The right knee is in the semiflexed position by placing the thigh and shin over the sandbags.

Mentions: The subject was in the supine position with the arms along the trunk on a rigid table. The head was placed on a pillow in the midline position. The right knee was positioned at 10–20° of flexion so that ankle movement was little affected by activity of the bi-articular muscle (Figure 1). The right thigh and shin were firmly tied to the table with belts to minimize knee movement artifacts. The right foot was placed beyond the table surface so that the subject could freely move the right ankle. An electrogoniometer measuring right ankle movement in the sagittal plane was placed on the dorsal side of the right foot, and signals from the goniometer were amplified with a strain amplifier (DPM-601A; Kyowa Dengyo, Tokyo, Japan). Ag/AgCl bipolar surface electrodes recording electromyographic (EMG) activity were placed on the bellies of the right tibialis anterior (TA) and SOL muscles 3 cm apart. The recording site of the SOL muscle was distal to the border of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle and medial to the border of the calcaneal tendon, and approximately 5–10 cm above the superior aspect of the calcaneus. The recording electrodes of the TA muscle were placed over the site where the muscle was most prominently hardened under voluntary contraction. EMG signals were amplified (MEG-2100; Nihon Kohden, Tokyo, Japan) with a band pass filter from 15 Hz to 3 kHz. EMG signals and signals from the strain amplifier were converted to digital signals at a sampling rate of 5 kHz using an A/D converter (Unique Acquisition UAS3; Unique Medical, Tokyo, Japan) and stored in a PC.


Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle.

Goto Y, Jono Y, Hatanaka R, Nomura Y, Tani K, Chujo Y, Hiraoka K - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Cartoon diagram of the experimental setup. Gray squares indicate bands bracing the thigh and thin to the table. The right knee is in the semiflexed position by placing the thigh and shin over the sandbags.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4115592&req=5

Figure 1: Cartoon diagram of the experimental setup. Gray squares indicate bands bracing the thigh and thin to the table. The right knee is in the semiflexed position by placing the thigh and shin over the sandbags.
Mentions: The subject was in the supine position with the arms along the trunk on a rigid table. The head was placed on a pillow in the midline position. The right knee was positioned at 10–20° of flexion so that ankle movement was little affected by activity of the bi-articular muscle (Figure 1). The right thigh and shin were firmly tied to the table with belts to minimize knee movement artifacts. The right foot was placed beyond the table surface so that the subject could freely move the right ankle. An electrogoniometer measuring right ankle movement in the sagittal plane was placed on the dorsal side of the right foot, and signals from the goniometer were amplified with a strain amplifier (DPM-601A; Kyowa Dengyo, Tokyo, Japan). Ag/AgCl bipolar surface electrodes recording electromyographic (EMG) activity were placed on the bellies of the right tibialis anterior (TA) and SOL muscles 3 cm apart. The recording site of the SOL muscle was distal to the border of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle and medial to the border of the calcaneal tendon, and approximately 5–10 cm above the superior aspect of the calcaneus. The recording electrodes of the TA muscle were placed over the site where the muscle was most prominently hardened under voluntary contraction. EMG signals were amplified (MEG-2100; Nihon Kohden, Tokyo, Japan) with a band pass filter from 15 Hz to 3 kHz. EMG signals and signals from the strain amplifier were converted to digital signals at a sampling rate of 5 kHz using an A/D converter (Unique Acquisition UAS3; Unique Medical, Tokyo, Japan) and stored in a PC.

Bottom Line: We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements.Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement.MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Osaka Prefecture University Habikino, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus