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Reduced brain resting-state network specificity in infants compared with adults.

Wylie KP, Rojas DC, Ross RG, Hunter SK, Maharajh K, Cornier MA, Tregellas JR - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2014)

Bottom Line: We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Infant resting-state networks do not exhibit the same connectivity patterns as those of young children and adults. Current theories of brain development emphasize developmental progression in regional and network specialization. We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.

Patients and methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest was acquired in 12 healthy, term infants and 17 adults. Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.

Results: Adults exhibited stronger connectivity in the posterior cingulate cortex node of the default mode network, but infants had higher connectivity in medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex than adults. Adult connectivity was typically higher than infant connectivity within structures previously associated with the various networks, whereas infant connectivity was frequently higher outside of these structures. Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

Conclusion: We interpret these findings as consistent with evidence suggesting that resting-state network development is associated with increasing spatial specificity, possibly reflecting the corresponding functional specialization of regions and their interconnections through experience.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Higher-level connectivity in infants and adults.Notes: The connectivity between resting-state networks (independent components analysis, displayed as purple circles) differed between infants and adults within three clusters (red circles), located with the bilateral parahippocampal gyri and right amygdala. Each location in adults was significantly connected to a single resting-state network, whereas infants featured both stronger and less-specific connectivity. All connections thresholded at FDR-corrected P<0.05.Abbreviations: RSN, resting-state network; ICA, independent components analysis; FDR, false discovery rate.
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f3-ndt-10-1349: Higher-level connectivity in infants and adults.Notes: The connectivity between resting-state networks (independent components analysis, displayed as purple circles) differed between infants and adults within three clusters (red circles), located with the bilateral parahippocampal gyri and right amygdala. Each location in adults was significantly connected to a single resting-state network, whereas infants featured both stronger and less-specific connectivity. All connections thresholded at FDR-corrected P<0.05.Abbreviations: RSN, resting-state network; ICA, independent components analysis; FDR, false discovery rate.

Mentions: The ability to mediate information flow between RSNs is associated with regions within the brain that are strongly connected to many large-scale networks.25 Because these regions show nonspecific connectivity that bridges multiple segregated networks, IS framework predicts there will be more of these areas in infants compared with adults. We investigated this possibility by searching for voxels with dissimilar voxel-to-RSN connectivity profiles, between adults and infants, and displaying their connections via statistical parametric networks.23 We identified three clusters with dissimilar higher-level connectivity in the bilateral parahippocampal gyri and right amygdala (Figure 3). In adult brains, the parahippocampal clusters were significantly connected to a single network, whereas the cluster within the amygdala was connected to a second network. In contrast, in infants, these same clusters exhibited widespread and stronger connectivity to many RSNs.


Reduced brain resting-state network specificity in infants compared with adults.

Wylie KP, Rojas DC, Ross RG, Hunter SK, Maharajh K, Cornier MA, Tregellas JR - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2014)

Higher-level connectivity in infants and adults.Notes: The connectivity between resting-state networks (independent components analysis, displayed as purple circles) differed between infants and adults within three clusters (red circles), located with the bilateral parahippocampal gyri and right amygdala. Each location in adults was significantly connected to a single resting-state network, whereas infants featured both stronger and less-specific connectivity. All connections thresholded at FDR-corrected P<0.05.Abbreviations: RSN, resting-state network; ICA, independent components analysis; FDR, false discovery rate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114919&req=5

f3-ndt-10-1349: Higher-level connectivity in infants and adults.Notes: The connectivity between resting-state networks (independent components analysis, displayed as purple circles) differed between infants and adults within three clusters (red circles), located with the bilateral parahippocampal gyri and right amygdala. Each location in adults was significantly connected to a single resting-state network, whereas infants featured both stronger and less-specific connectivity. All connections thresholded at FDR-corrected P<0.05.Abbreviations: RSN, resting-state network; ICA, independent components analysis; FDR, false discovery rate.
Mentions: The ability to mediate information flow between RSNs is associated with regions within the brain that are strongly connected to many large-scale networks.25 Because these regions show nonspecific connectivity that bridges multiple segregated networks, IS framework predicts there will be more of these areas in infants compared with adults. We investigated this possibility by searching for voxels with dissimilar voxel-to-RSN connectivity profiles, between adults and infants, and displaying their connections via statistical parametric networks.23 We identified three clusters with dissimilar higher-level connectivity in the bilateral parahippocampal gyri and right amygdala (Figure 3). In adult brains, the parahippocampal clusters were significantly connected to a single network, whereas the cluster within the amygdala was connected to a second network. In contrast, in infants, these same clusters exhibited widespread and stronger connectivity to many RSNs.

Bottom Line: We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Infant resting-state networks do not exhibit the same connectivity patterns as those of young children and adults. Current theories of brain development emphasize developmental progression in regional and network specialization. We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.

Patients and methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest was acquired in 12 healthy, term infants and 17 adults. Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.

Results: Adults exhibited stronger connectivity in the posterior cingulate cortex node of the default mode network, but infants had higher connectivity in medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex than adults. Adult connectivity was typically higher than infant connectivity within structures previously associated with the various networks, whereas infant connectivity was frequently higher outside of these structures. Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

Conclusion: We interpret these findings as consistent with evidence suggesting that resting-state network development is associated with increasing spatial specificity, possibly reflecting the corresponding functional specialization of regions and their interconnections through experience.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus