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Reduced brain resting-state network specificity in infants compared with adults.

Wylie KP, Rojas DC, Ross RG, Hunter SK, Maharajh K, Cornier MA, Tregellas JR - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2014)

Bottom Line: We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Infant resting-state networks do not exhibit the same connectivity patterns as those of young children and adults. Current theories of brain development emphasize developmental progression in regional and network specialization. We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.

Patients and methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest was acquired in 12 healthy, term infants and 17 adults. Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.

Results: Adults exhibited stronger connectivity in the posterior cingulate cortex node of the default mode network, but infants had higher connectivity in medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex than adults. Adult connectivity was typically higher than infant connectivity within structures previously associated with the various networks, whereas infant connectivity was frequently higher outside of these structures. Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

Conclusion: We interpret these findings as consistent with evidence suggesting that resting-state network development is associated with increasing spatial specificity, possibly reflecting the corresponding functional specialization of regions and their interconnections through experience.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regional differences in resting-state networks in infants and adults.Notes: Shown are regions that differ in their association to the same network between adults and infants. Each brain is shown in sagittal, coronal, and axial views and is displayed in two columns based on the direction of the group contrast, with the adults greater than infants on the left and infants greater than adults on the right. All contrasts thresholded at P<0.05 FWE-corrected for multiple comparisons. Resting-state network labels: (A) V1, (B) V2, (C) auditory, (D) sensorimotor, (E) basal ganglia, (F) precuneus, (G) visuospatial, (H) language, (I) left executive control, (J) right executive control, and (K) anterior salience.Abbreviations: ns, nonsignificant; FWE, familywise error rate.
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f2-ndt-10-1349: Regional differences in resting-state networks in infants and adults.Notes: Shown are regions that differ in their association to the same network between adults and infants. Each brain is shown in sagittal, coronal, and axial views and is displayed in two columns based on the direction of the group contrast, with the adults greater than infants on the left and infants greater than adults on the right. All contrasts thresholded at P<0.05 FWE-corrected for multiple comparisons. Resting-state network labels: (A) V1, (B) V2, (C) auditory, (D) sensorimotor, (E) basal ganglia, (F) precuneus, (G) visuospatial, (H) language, (I) left executive control, (J) right executive control, and (K) anterior salience.Abbreviations: ns, nonsignificant; FWE, familywise error rate.


Reduced brain resting-state network specificity in infants compared with adults.

Wylie KP, Rojas DC, Ross RG, Hunter SK, Maharajh K, Cornier MA, Tregellas JR - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2014)

Regional differences in resting-state networks in infants and adults.Notes: Shown are regions that differ in their association to the same network between adults and infants. Each brain is shown in sagittal, coronal, and axial views and is displayed in two columns based on the direction of the group contrast, with the adults greater than infants on the left and infants greater than adults on the right. All contrasts thresholded at P<0.05 FWE-corrected for multiple comparisons. Resting-state network labels: (A) V1, (B) V2, (C) auditory, (D) sensorimotor, (E) basal ganglia, (F) precuneus, (G) visuospatial, (H) language, (I) left executive control, (J) right executive control, and (K) anterior salience.Abbreviations: ns, nonsignificant; FWE, familywise error rate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114919&req=5

f2-ndt-10-1349: Regional differences in resting-state networks in infants and adults.Notes: Shown are regions that differ in their association to the same network between adults and infants. Each brain is shown in sagittal, coronal, and axial views and is displayed in two columns based on the direction of the group contrast, with the adults greater than infants on the left and infants greater than adults on the right. All contrasts thresholded at P<0.05 FWE-corrected for multiple comparisons. Resting-state network labels: (A) V1, (B) V2, (C) auditory, (D) sensorimotor, (E) basal ganglia, (F) precuneus, (G) visuospatial, (H) language, (I) left executive control, (J) right executive control, and (K) anterior salience.Abbreviations: ns, nonsignificant; FWE, familywise error rate.
Bottom Line: We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Infant resting-state networks do not exhibit the same connectivity patterns as those of young children and adults. Current theories of brain development emphasize developmental progression in regional and network specialization. We compared infant and adult functional connectivity, predicting that infants would exhibit less regional specificity and greater internetwork communication compared with adults.

Patients and methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest was acquired in 12 healthy, term infants and 17 adults. Resting-state networks were extracted, using independent components analysis, and the resulting components were then compared between the adult and infant groups.

Results: Adults exhibited stronger connectivity in the posterior cingulate cortex node of the default mode network, but infants had higher connectivity in medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex than adults. Adult connectivity was typically higher than infant connectivity within structures previously associated with the various networks, whereas infant connectivity was frequently higher outside of these structures. Internetwork communication was significantly higher in infants than in adults.

Conclusion: We interpret these findings as consistent with evidence suggesting that resting-state network development is associated with increasing spatial specificity, possibly reflecting the corresponding functional specialization of regions and their interconnections through experience.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus