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Green synthesis of protein capped silver nanoparticles from phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid with antimicrobial properties against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Chowdhury S, Basu A, Kundu S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated.Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed.The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Applied Mycology and Plant Pathology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Calcutta, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700019, India.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, green synthesis of nanoparticles, i.e., synthesizing nanoparticles using biological sources like bacteria, algae, fungus, or plant extracts have attracted much attention due to its environment-friendly and economic aspects. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly and low-cost method of biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell-free filtrate of phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. UV-visible spectrum showed a peak at 450 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles of the size range 5 to 40 nm, most of these being 16 to 20 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the nanoparticles exhibited 2θ values corresponding to silver nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the presence of an 85-kDa protein band responsible for capping and stabilization of the silver nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed. The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of the silver nanoparticles with increasing concentrations was evaluated by DNA fragmentation studies using plasmid DNA.

No MeSH data available.


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Antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles on normal and multidrug-resistant plant pathogenic bacteria A. tumefaciens by disc diffusion method. (a) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) with increasing concentrations of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total a volume 100 μl in water. (b) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR) with increasing concentration of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total volume of 100 μl in water. (c) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the nanoparticles on A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) in which 10, 20, 50, 70, and 100% nanoparticle solution corresponds to 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg of silver nanoparticles in 100 μl solution. (d) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the silver nanoparticles on MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR). Vertical bars indicate mean of three experiments ± standard error of mean (SEM). Different letters on bars indicate significant differences among treatments (P = 0.05).
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Figure 5: Antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles on normal and multidrug-resistant plant pathogenic bacteria A. tumefaciens by disc diffusion method. (a) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) with increasing concentrations of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total a volume 100 μl in water. (b) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR) with increasing concentration of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total volume of 100 μl in water. (c) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the nanoparticles on A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) in which 10, 20, 50, 70, and 100% nanoparticle solution corresponds to 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg of silver nanoparticles in 100 μl solution. (d) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the silver nanoparticles on MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR). Vertical bars indicate mean of three experiments ± standard error of mean (SEM). Different letters on bars indicate significant differences among treatments (P = 0.05).

Mentions: The human bacteria E. coli and the plant pathogenic bacteria A. tumefaciens were used to assay the antimicrobial activity of the silver nanoparticles. The normal E. coli (Figure 4a) as well as the MDR E. coli (Figure 4b) plates showed inhibition zones which increased with the increase in concentration of nanoparticles. The graphs of the inhibition zones show nearly similar inhibitory activity of the nanoparticles against the normal and the MDR E. coli (Figure 4c,d). Similarly, normal and MDR A. tumefaciens plates showed increase in inhibition zones in response to increase in nanoparticle concentration (Figure 5a,b). The graphs of inhibition zone as a function of increasing concentration of nanoparticles (Figure 5c,d) showed similar trend with that of the E. coli. In general, A. tumefaciens (both LBA4404 and LBA4404 MDR) showed greater sensitivity to the silver nanoparticles than E. coli (DH5α) and multidrug-resistant E. coli (DH5α-MDR).


Green synthesis of protein capped silver nanoparticles from phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid with antimicrobial properties against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Chowdhury S, Basu A, Kundu S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles on normal and multidrug-resistant plant pathogenic bacteria A. tumefaciens by disc diffusion method. (a) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) with increasing concentrations of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total a volume 100 μl in water. (b) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR) with increasing concentration of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total volume of 100 μl in water. (c) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the nanoparticles on A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) in which 10, 20, 50, 70, and 100% nanoparticle solution corresponds to 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg of silver nanoparticles in 100 μl solution. (d) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the silver nanoparticles on MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR). Vertical bars indicate mean of three experiments ± standard error of mean (SEM). Different letters on bars indicate significant differences among treatments (P = 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
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Figure 5: Antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles on normal and multidrug-resistant plant pathogenic bacteria A. tumefaciens by disc diffusion method. (a) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) with increasing concentrations of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total a volume 100 μl in water. (b) Plate showing increasing inhibition zone of MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR) with increasing concentration of nanoparticles: clockwise from top 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg in a total volume of 100 μl in water. (c) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the nanoparticles on A. tumefaciens (LBA4404) in which 10, 20, 50, 70, and 100% nanoparticle solution corresponds to 0.51, 1.02, 2.55, 3.57, and 5.1 μg of silver nanoparticles in 100 μl solution. (d) Graph of antimicrobial assay of the silver nanoparticles on MDR A. tumefaciens (LBA4404-MDR). Vertical bars indicate mean of three experiments ± standard error of mean (SEM). Different letters on bars indicate significant differences among treatments (P = 0.05).
Mentions: The human bacteria E. coli and the plant pathogenic bacteria A. tumefaciens were used to assay the antimicrobial activity of the silver nanoparticles. The normal E. coli (Figure 4a) as well as the MDR E. coli (Figure 4b) plates showed inhibition zones which increased with the increase in concentration of nanoparticles. The graphs of the inhibition zones show nearly similar inhibitory activity of the nanoparticles against the normal and the MDR E. coli (Figure 4c,d). Similarly, normal and MDR A. tumefaciens plates showed increase in inhibition zones in response to increase in nanoparticle concentration (Figure 5a,b). The graphs of inhibition zone as a function of increasing concentration of nanoparticles (Figure 5c,d) showed similar trend with that of the E. coli. In general, A. tumefaciens (both LBA4404 and LBA4404 MDR) showed greater sensitivity to the silver nanoparticles than E. coli (DH5α) and multidrug-resistant E. coli (DH5α-MDR).

Bottom Line: These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated.Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed.The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Applied Mycology and Plant Pathology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Calcutta, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700019, India.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, green synthesis of nanoparticles, i.e., synthesizing nanoparticles using biological sources like bacteria, algae, fungus, or plant extracts have attracted much attention due to its environment-friendly and economic aspects. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly and low-cost method of biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell-free filtrate of phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. UV-visible spectrum showed a peak at 450 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles of the size range 5 to 40 nm, most of these being 16 to 20 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the nanoparticles exhibited 2θ values corresponding to silver nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the presence of an 85-kDa protein band responsible for capping and stabilization of the silver nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed. The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of the silver nanoparticles with increasing concentrations was evaluated by DNA fragmentation studies using plasmid DNA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus