Limits...
Molluscum contagiosum in a pediatric American Indian population: incidence and risk factors.

McCollum AM, Holman RC, Hughes CM, Mehal JM, Folkema AM, Redd JT, Cheek JE, Damon IK, Reynolds MG - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: MC cases were more likely to have a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema, eczema or dermatitis, impetigo, and scabies (p<0.05) compared to controls; 51.4% of MC cases had a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis.The present study is the first demonstration of an association between AD and MC using a case-control study design.It is unknown if the concurrent high incidence of eczema and MC is related, and this association deserves further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Scientific Education and Professional Development Program Office, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) causes an innocuous yet persistent skin infection in immunocompetent individuals and is spread by contact with lesions. Studies point to atopic dermatitis (AD) as a risk factor for MCV infection; however, there are no longitudinal studies that have evaluated this hypothesis.

Methods: Outpatient visit data from fiscal years 2001-2009 for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children were examined to describe the incidence of molluscum contagiosum (MC). We conducted a case-control study of patients <5 years old at an Indian Health Service (IHS) clinic to evaluate dermatological risk factors for infection.

Results: The incidence rate for MC in children <5 years old was highest in the West and East regions. MC cases were more likely to have a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema, eczema or dermatitis, impetigo, and scabies (p<0.05) compared to controls; 51.4% of MC cases had a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis.

Conclusions: The present study is the first demonstration of an association between AD and MC using a case-control study design. It is unknown if the concurrent high incidence of eczema and MC is related, and this association deserves further investigation.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The frequency of dermatological risk factors in MC case patients at three time periods relative to the initial visit where MC was diagnosed - a) prior dermatological conditions (blue), b) co-occurring dermatological conditions (red), and c) a combination of prior and co-occurring conditions (green).MC cases include those from Facilities A and B.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114779&req=5

pone-0103419-g001: The frequency of dermatological risk factors in MC case patients at three time periods relative to the initial visit where MC was diagnosed - a) prior dermatological conditions (blue), b) co-occurring dermatological conditions (red), and c) a combination of prior and co-occurring conditions (green).MC cases include those from Facilities A and B.

Mentions: The frequencies of these risk factors in MC patients at both facilities and for the three time periods examined are shown in Figure 1. In considering any time period, 30.9% of MC cases had a diagnosis of eczema and 51.4% had a diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis. Also, 26.6% and 8.1% of MC cases had a diagnosis of impetigo or scabies, respectively.


Molluscum contagiosum in a pediatric American Indian population: incidence and risk factors.

McCollum AM, Holman RC, Hughes CM, Mehal JM, Folkema AM, Redd JT, Cheek JE, Damon IK, Reynolds MG - PLoS ONE (2014)

The frequency of dermatological risk factors in MC case patients at three time periods relative to the initial visit where MC was diagnosed - a) prior dermatological conditions (blue), b) co-occurring dermatological conditions (red), and c) a combination of prior and co-occurring conditions (green).MC cases include those from Facilities A and B.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114779&req=5

pone-0103419-g001: The frequency of dermatological risk factors in MC case patients at three time periods relative to the initial visit where MC was diagnosed - a) prior dermatological conditions (blue), b) co-occurring dermatological conditions (red), and c) a combination of prior and co-occurring conditions (green).MC cases include those from Facilities A and B.
Mentions: The frequencies of these risk factors in MC patients at both facilities and for the three time periods examined are shown in Figure 1. In considering any time period, 30.9% of MC cases had a diagnosis of eczema and 51.4% had a diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis. Also, 26.6% and 8.1% of MC cases had a diagnosis of impetigo or scabies, respectively.

Bottom Line: MC cases were more likely to have a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema, eczema or dermatitis, impetigo, and scabies (p<0.05) compared to controls; 51.4% of MC cases had a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis.The present study is the first demonstration of an association between AD and MC using a case-control study design.It is unknown if the concurrent high incidence of eczema and MC is related, and this association deserves further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Scientific Education and Professional Development Program Office, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) causes an innocuous yet persistent skin infection in immunocompetent individuals and is spread by contact with lesions. Studies point to atopic dermatitis (AD) as a risk factor for MCV infection; however, there are no longitudinal studies that have evaluated this hypothesis.

Methods: Outpatient visit data from fiscal years 2001-2009 for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children were examined to describe the incidence of molluscum contagiosum (MC). We conducted a case-control study of patients <5 years old at an Indian Health Service (IHS) clinic to evaluate dermatological risk factors for infection.

Results: The incidence rate for MC in children <5 years old was highest in the West and East regions. MC cases were more likely to have a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema, eczema or dermatitis, impetigo, and scabies (p<0.05) compared to controls; 51.4% of MC cases had a prior or co-occurring diagnosis of eczema or dermatitis.

Conclusions: The present study is the first demonstration of an association between AD and MC using a case-control study design. It is unknown if the concurrent high incidence of eczema and MC is related, and this association deserves further investigation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus