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Who Uses Smoking Cessation Apps? A Feasibility Study Across Three Countries via Smartphones.

BinDhim NF, McGeechan K, Trevena L - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences between countries in terms of age, operation system used, number of quitting attempts, and language spoken at home.However, there were significant differences between countries in terms of gender and stage of change.They also frequently used other health related apps, mostly without checking the credibility of their publishers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Sydney Medical School, Department of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. nbin6641@uni.sydney.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Smartphone use is growing worldwide. While hundreds of smoking cessation apps are currently available in the app stores, there is no information about who uses them. Smartphones also offer potential as a research tool, but this has not previously been explored.

Objective: This study aims to measure and compare the uptake of a smoking cessation app over one year in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It also assesses the feasibility of conducting research via an app, describing respondents' characteristics (demographics, smoking status, and other health related app use), and examining differences across countries.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional exploratory study of adults 18 years and older, passively recruited over one year in 2012, who downloaded this study app (Quit Advisor) via the two largest app stores (Apple and Android).

Results: The total number of app downloads after one year was 1751, 72.98% (1278/1751) of them were Apple operation system users. Of these 1751 participants, 47.68% (835/1751) were from the United States, 29.18% (511/1751) were from the United Kingdom, and 16.68% (292/1751) were from Australia. There were 602 participants, 36.75% (602/1638) that completed a questionnaire within the app. Of these 602 participants, 58.8% (354/602) were female and the mean age was 32 years. There were no significant differences between countries in terms of age, operation system used, number of quitting attempts, and language spoken at home. However, there were significant differences between countries in terms of gender and stage of change. There were 77.2% (465/602) of the respondents that were ready to quit in the next 30 days and the majority of these had never sought professional help (eg, "Quitline"). More than half had downloaded smoking cessation apps in the past and of these, three-quarters had made quitting attempts (lasted at least 24 hours) using an app before. Respondents who had attempted to quit three times or more in the previous year were more likely to have tried smoking cessation apps (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1-5.2). There were 50.2% (302/602) of the respondents that had used other health related apps before. Of these, 89.4% (270/302) were using health related apps at least once a week, but 77.5% (234/302) never checked the credibility of the health app publishers before downloading.

Conclusions: A smartphone app was able to reach smokers across three countries that were not seeking professional help, but were ready to quit within the next 30 days. Respondents were relatively young and almost demographically similar across all three countries. They also frequently used other health related apps, mostly without checking the credibility of their publishers.

No MeSH data available.


Flowchart of the recruitment process. The percentages were rounded up to the nearest whole.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure2: Flowchart of the recruitment process. The percentages were rounded up to the nearest whole.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows, in one year, 1751 users downloaded the app from both stores, 72.98% (1278/1751) from the Apple Store and 27.01% (473/1751) from the Android Market. Of those 1751, 47.68% (835/1751) were from the United States, 29.18% (511/1751) from the United Kingdom, 16.68% (292/1751) from Australia, and 6.45% (113/1751) from other countries. The lowest Android download rate was in Australia at 9.7% (46/473), compared with 19.25% (246/1278) for Apple OS. After excluding users who submitted the questionnaire from other countries, 602 had submitted it, with an overall response rate of 36.75% (602/1638). The highest response rate was 44.8% (131/292), from Australia.


Who Uses Smoking Cessation Apps? A Feasibility Study Across Three Countries via Smartphones.

BinDhim NF, McGeechan K, Trevena L - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Flowchart of the recruitment process. The percentages were rounded up to the nearest whole.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114511&req=5

figure2: Flowchart of the recruitment process. The percentages were rounded up to the nearest whole.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows, in one year, 1751 users downloaded the app from both stores, 72.98% (1278/1751) from the Apple Store and 27.01% (473/1751) from the Android Market. Of those 1751, 47.68% (835/1751) were from the United States, 29.18% (511/1751) from the United Kingdom, 16.68% (292/1751) from Australia, and 6.45% (113/1751) from other countries. The lowest Android download rate was in Australia at 9.7% (46/473), compared with 19.25% (246/1278) for Apple OS. After excluding users who submitted the questionnaire from other countries, 602 had submitted it, with an overall response rate of 36.75% (602/1638). The highest response rate was 44.8% (131/292), from Australia.

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences between countries in terms of age, operation system used, number of quitting attempts, and language spoken at home.However, there were significant differences between countries in terms of gender and stage of change.They also frequently used other health related apps, mostly without checking the credibility of their publishers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Sydney Medical School, Department of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. nbin6641@uni.sydney.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Smartphone use is growing worldwide. While hundreds of smoking cessation apps are currently available in the app stores, there is no information about who uses them. Smartphones also offer potential as a research tool, but this has not previously been explored.

Objective: This study aims to measure and compare the uptake of a smoking cessation app over one year in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It also assesses the feasibility of conducting research via an app, describing respondents' characteristics (demographics, smoking status, and other health related app use), and examining differences across countries.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional exploratory study of adults 18 years and older, passively recruited over one year in 2012, who downloaded this study app (Quit Advisor) via the two largest app stores (Apple and Android).

Results: The total number of app downloads after one year was 1751, 72.98% (1278/1751) of them were Apple operation system users. Of these 1751 participants, 47.68% (835/1751) were from the United States, 29.18% (511/1751) were from the United Kingdom, and 16.68% (292/1751) were from Australia. There were 602 participants, 36.75% (602/1638) that completed a questionnaire within the app. Of these 602 participants, 58.8% (354/602) were female and the mean age was 32 years. There were no significant differences between countries in terms of age, operation system used, number of quitting attempts, and language spoken at home. However, there were significant differences between countries in terms of gender and stage of change. There were 77.2% (465/602) of the respondents that were ready to quit in the next 30 days and the majority of these had never sought professional help (eg, "Quitline"). More than half had downloaded smoking cessation apps in the past and of these, three-quarters had made quitting attempts (lasted at least 24 hours) using an app before. Respondents who had attempted to quit three times or more in the previous year were more likely to have tried smoking cessation apps (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1-5.2). There were 50.2% (302/602) of the respondents that had used other health related apps before. Of these, 89.4% (270/302) were using health related apps at least once a week, but 77.5% (234/302) never checked the credibility of the health app publishers before downloading.

Conclusions: A smartphone app was able to reach smokers across three countries that were not seeking professional help, but were ready to quit within the next 30 days. Respondents were relatively young and almost demographically similar across all three countries. They also frequently used other health related apps, mostly without checking the credibility of their publishers.

No MeSH data available.