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Usage of social media and smartphone application in assessment of physical and psychological well-being of individuals in times of a major air pollution crisis.

Zhang MW, Ho CSh, Fang P, Lu Y, Ho RC - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis showed that demographic variables like age, gender, and educational levels did not influence the mechanism of access.Our results demonstrated that the newer technological modalities have the potential to acquire data, similar to that of conventional technologies.Demographic variables did not influence the mechanism of usage.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Southeast Asian Haze Research Consortium, Department of Medical Psychology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, China, China. melvynzhangweibin@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Crisis situations bring about many challenges to researchers, public institutions, and governments in collecting data and conducting research in affected individuals. Recent developments in Web-based and smartphone technologies have offered government and nongovernment organizations a new system to disseminate and acquire information. However, research into this area is still lacking. The current study focuses largely on how new social networking websites and, in particular, smartphone technologies could have helped in the acquisition of crucial research data from the general population during the recent 2013 Southeast Asian Haze. This crisis lasted only for 1 week, and is unlike other crisis where there are large-scale consequential after-effects.

Objective: To determine whether respondents will make use of Internet, social media, and smartphone technologies to provide feedback regarding their physical and psychological wellbeing during a crisis, and if so, will these new mechanisms be as effective as conventional, technological, Internet-based website technologies.

Methods: A Web-based database and a smartphone application were developed. Participants were recruited by snowball sampling. The participants were recruited either via a self-sponsored Facebook post featuring a direct link to the questionnaire on physical and psychological wellbeing and also a smartphone Web-based application; or via dissemination of the questionnaire link by emails, directed to the same group of participants. Information pertaining to physical and psychological wellbeing was collated.

Results: A total of 298 respondents took part in the survey. Most of them were between the ages of 20 to 29 years and had a university education. More individuals preferred the option of accessing and providing feedback to a survey on physical and psychological wellbeing via direct access to a Web-based questionnaire. Statistical analysis showed that demographic variables like age, gender, and educational levels did not influence the mechanism of access. In addition, the participants reported a mean number of 4.03 physical symptoms (SD 2.6). The total Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) score was 18.47 (SD 11.69), which indicated that the study population did experience psychological stress but not post-traumatic stress disorder. The perceived dangerous Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) level and the number of physical symptoms were associated with higher IES-R Score (P<.05).

Conclusions: This is one of the first few studies demonstrating the use of Internet in data collection during an air-pollution crisis. Our results demonstrated that the newer technological modalities have the potential to acquire data, similar to that of conventional technologies. Demographic variables did not influence the mechanism of usage. In addition, our findings also suggested that there are acute physical and psychological impacts on the population from an air-pollution crisis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Web-based assessment quiz integrated within application.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure5: Web-based assessment quiz integrated within application.


Usage of social media and smartphone application in assessment of physical and psychological well-being of individuals in times of a major air pollution crisis.

Zhang MW, Ho CSh, Fang P, Lu Y, Ho RC - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Web-based assessment quiz integrated within application.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114481&req=5

figure5: Web-based assessment quiz integrated within application.
Bottom Line: Statistical analysis showed that demographic variables like age, gender, and educational levels did not influence the mechanism of access.Our results demonstrated that the newer technological modalities have the potential to acquire data, similar to that of conventional technologies.Demographic variables did not influence the mechanism of usage.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Southeast Asian Haze Research Consortium, Department of Medical Psychology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, China, China. melvynzhangweibin@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Crisis situations bring about many challenges to researchers, public institutions, and governments in collecting data and conducting research in affected individuals. Recent developments in Web-based and smartphone technologies have offered government and nongovernment organizations a new system to disseminate and acquire information. However, research into this area is still lacking. The current study focuses largely on how new social networking websites and, in particular, smartphone technologies could have helped in the acquisition of crucial research data from the general population during the recent 2013 Southeast Asian Haze. This crisis lasted only for 1 week, and is unlike other crisis where there are large-scale consequential after-effects.

Objective: To determine whether respondents will make use of Internet, social media, and smartphone technologies to provide feedback regarding their physical and psychological wellbeing during a crisis, and if so, will these new mechanisms be as effective as conventional, technological, Internet-based website technologies.

Methods: A Web-based database and a smartphone application were developed. Participants were recruited by snowball sampling. The participants were recruited either via a self-sponsored Facebook post featuring a direct link to the questionnaire on physical and psychological wellbeing and also a smartphone Web-based application; or via dissemination of the questionnaire link by emails, directed to the same group of participants. Information pertaining to physical and psychological wellbeing was collated.

Results: A total of 298 respondents took part in the survey. Most of them were between the ages of 20 to 29 years and had a university education. More individuals preferred the option of accessing and providing feedback to a survey on physical and psychological wellbeing via direct access to a Web-based questionnaire. Statistical analysis showed that demographic variables like age, gender, and educational levels did not influence the mechanism of access. In addition, the participants reported a mean number of 4.03 physical symptoms (SD 2.6). The total Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) score was 18.47 (SD 11.69), which indicated that the study population did experience psychological stress but not post-traumatic stress disorder. The perceived dangerous Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) level and the number of physical symptoms were associated with higher IES-R Score (P<.05).

Conclusions: This is one of the first few studies demonstrating the use of Internet in data collection during an air-pollution crisis. Our results demonstrated that the newer technological modalities have the potential to acquire data, similar to that of conventional technologies. Demographic variables did not influence the mechanism of usage. In addition, our findings also suggested that there are acute physical and psychological impacts on the population from an air-pollution crisis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus