Limits...
Comparison of mobile apps for the leading causes of death among different income zones: a review of the literature and app stores.

Martínez-Pérez B, de la Torre-Díez I, López-Coronado M, Sainz-De-Abajo B - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Bottom Line: HIV/AIDS, in the top 6 of low-income and middle-income zones, is one of the diseases with more research and applications, although it is not in the top 10 in high-income countries.Concerning mobile apps, there is more work done in the commercial field than in the research field, although the distribution among the diseases is similar in both fields.In general, apps for common diseases of low- and middle-income countries are not as abundant as those for typical diseases of developed countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Valladolid, Department of Signal Theory and Communications, and Telematics Engineering, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. borja.martinez@uva.es.

ABSTRACT

Background: The advances achieved in technology, medicine, and communications in the past decades have created an excellent scenario for the improvement and expansion of eHeath and mHealth in particular. Mobile phones, smartphones, and tablets are exceptional means for the application of mobile health, especially for those diseases and health conditions that are the deadliest worldwide.

Objective: The main aim of this paper was to compare the amount of research and the number of mobile apps dedicated to the diseases and conditions that are the leading causes of death according to the World Health Organization grouped by different income regions. These diseases and conditions were ischemic heart disease; stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases; lower respiratory infections; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; diarrheal diseases; HIV/AIDS; trachea, bronchus, and lung cancers; malaria; and Alzheimer disease and other dementias.

Methods: Two reviews were conducted. In the first, the systems IEEE Xplore, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and PubMed were used to perform a literature review of applications related to the mentioned diseases. The second was developed in the currently most important mobile phone apps stores: Google play, iTunes, BlackBerry World, and Windows Phone Apps+Games.

Results: Search queries up to June 2013 located 371 papers and 557 apps related to the leading causes of death, and the following findings were obtained. Alzheimer disease and other dementias are included in the diseases with more apps, although it is not among the top 10 causes of death worldwide, whereas lower respiratory infections, the third leading cause of death, is one of the less researched and with fewer apps. Two diseases that are the first and second of low-income countries (lower respiratory infections and diarrheal diseases) have very little research and few commercial applications. HIV/AIDS, in the top 6 of low-income and middle-income zones, is one of the diseases with more research and applications, although it is not in the top 10 in high-income countries. Trachea, bronchus, and lung cancers are the third cause of death in high-income countries but are one of the least researched diseases with regard to apps.

Conclusions: Concerning mobile apps, there is more work done in the commercial field than in the research field, although the distribution among the diseases is similar in both fields. In general, apps for common diseases of low- and middle-income countries are not as abundant as those for typical diseases of developed countries. Nevertheless, there are some exceptions such as HIV/AIDS, due to its important social conscience; and trachea, bronchus and lung cancers, which was totally unexpected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of the steps followed in the reviews.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114467&req=5

figure2: Flow chart of the steps followed in the reviews.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows a flowchart with the steps followed in both literature and commercial reviews. All the systems returned 1113 results, with 624 repeated or with an irrelevant title for this study. Of the remaining 489 papers, 118 were dismissed after reading their abstract or the whole paper when necessary. Finally, a total of 371 papers (33.3%) were selected as relevant. For considering a paper relevant, it had to fulfil some criteria: it must be focused on applications using mobile phones or devices, it must be written in English, and it has to be about a mobile app or apps designed for the sought condition. This means that papers centered on applications for several and different diseases were dismissed even if one of the illnesses treated was the one sought.


Comparison of mobile apps for the leading causes of death among different income zones: a review of the literature and app stores.

Martínez-Pérez B, de la Torre-Díez I, López-Coronado M, Sainz-De-Abajo B - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Flow chart of the steps followed in the reviews.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114467&req=5

figure2: Flow chart of the steps followed in the reviews.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows a flowchart with the steps followed in both literature and commercial reviews. All the systems returned 1113 results, with 624 repeated or with an irrelevant title for this study. Of the remaining 489 papers, 118 were dismissed after reading their abstract or the whole paper when necessary. Finally, a total of 371 papers (33.3%) were selected as relevant. For considering a paper relevant, it had to fulfil some criteria: it must be focused on applications using mobile phones or devices, it must be written in English, and it has to be about a mobile app or apps designed for the sought condition. This means that papers centered on applications for several and different diseases were dismissed even if one of the illnesses treated was the one sought.

Bottom Line: HIV/AIDS, in the top 6 of low-income and middle-income zones, is one of the diseases with more research and applications, although it is not in the top 10 in high-income countries.Concerning mobile apps, there is more work done in the commercial field than in the research field, although the distribution among the diseases is similar in both fields.In general, apps for common diseases of low- and middle-income countries are not as abundant as those for typical diseases of developed countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Valladolid, Department of Signal Theory and Communications, and Telematics Engineering, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. borja.martinez@uva.es.

ABSTRACT

Background: The advances achieved in technology, medicine, and communications in the past decades have created an excellent scenario for the improvement and expansion of eHeath and mHealth in particular. Mobile phones, smartphones, and tablets are exceptional means for the application of mobile health, especially for those diseases and health conditions that are the deadliest worldwide.

Objective: The main aim of this paper was to compare the amount of research and the number of mobile apps dedicated to the diseases and conditions that are the leading causes of death according to the World Health Organization grouped by different income regions. These diseases and conditions were ischemic heart disease; stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases; lower respiratory infections; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; diarrheal diseases; HIV/AIDS; trachea, bronchus, and lung cancers; malaria; and Alzheimer disease and other dementias.

Methods: Two reviews were conducted. In the first, the systems IEEE Xplore, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and PubMed were used to perform a literature review of applications related to the mentioned diseases. The second was developed in the currently most important mobile phone apps stores: Google play, iTunes, BlackBerry World, and Windows Phone Apps+Games.

Results: Search queries up to June 2013 located 371 papers and 557 apps related to the leading causes of death, and the following findings were obtained. Alzheimer disease and other dementias are included in the diseases with more apps, although it is not among the top 10 causes of death worldwide, whereas lower respiratory infections, the third leading cause of death, is one of the less researched and with fewer apps. Two diseases that are the first and second of low-income countries (lower respiratory infections and diarrheal diseases) have very little research and few commercial applications. HIV/AIDS, in the top 6 of low-income and middle-income zones, is one of the diseases with more research and applications, although it is not in the top 10 in high-income countries. Trachea, bronchus, and lung cancers are the third cause of death in high-income countries but are one of the least researched diseases with regard to apps.

Conclusions: Concerning mobile apps, there is more work done in the commercial field than in the research field, although the distribution among the diseases is similar in both fields. In general, apps for common diseases of low- and middle-income countries are not as abundant as those for typical diseases of developed countries. Nevertheless, there are some exceptions such as HIV/AIDS, due to its important social conscience; and trachea, bronchus and lung cancers, which was totally unexpected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus