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Development of a Theoretically Driven mHealth Text Messaging Application for Sustaining Recent Weight Loss.

Shaw RJ, Bosworth HB, Hess JC, Silva SG, Lipkus IM, Davis LL, Johnson CM - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2013)

Bottom Line: Results were then used to develop the SMS text messaging application.Study results demonstrated the feasibility of developing weight loss SMS text messages, and the development of an mHealth SMS text messaging application.SMS text messaging was perceived as an appropriate and accepted tool to deliver health promotion content.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States. ryan.shaw@duke.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Mobile phone short message service (SMS) text messaging, has the potential to serve as an intervention medium to promote sustainability of weight loss that can be easily and affordably used by clinicians and consumers.

Objective: To develop theoretically driven weight loss sustaining text messages and pilot an mHealth SMS text messaging intervention to promote sustaining recent weight loss in order to understand optimal frequency and timing of message delivery, and for feasibility and usability testing. Results from the pilot study were used to design and construct a patient privacy compliant automated SMS application to deliver weight loss sustaining messages.

Methods: We first conducted a pilot study in which participants (N=16) received a daily SMS text message for one month following a structured weight loss program. Messages were developed from diet and exercise guidelines. Following the intervention, interviews were conducted and self-reported weight was collected via SMS text messaging.

Results: All participants (N=16) were capable of sending and receiving SMS text messages. During the phone interview at 1 month post-baseline and at 3 months post-baseline, 13/14 (93%) of participants who completed the study reported their weight via SMS. At 3 months post-baseline, 79% (11/14) participants sustained or continued to lose weight. Participants (13/14, 93%) were favorable toward the messages and the majority (10/14, 71%) felt they were useful in helping them sustain weight loss. All 14 participants who completed the interview thought SMS was a favorable communication medium and was useful to receive short relevant messages promptly and directly. All participants read the messages when they knew they arrived and most (11/14, 79%) read the messages at the time of delivery. All participants felt that at least one daily message is needed to sustain weight loss behaviors and that they should be delivered in the morning. Results were then used to develop the SMS text messaging application.

Conclusions: Study results demonstrated the feasibility of developing weight loss SMS text messages, and the development of an mHealth SMS text messaging application. SMS text messaging was perceived as an appropriate and accepted tool to deliver health promotion content.

No MeSH data available.


Rothman’s behavior change process [42].
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure1: Rothman’s behavior change process [42].

Mentions: To develop an intervention to focus on sustaining weight loss following initiation and completion of a structure weight loss program, Rothman’s Behavior Change Process [42] (Figure 1) was used as a guiding framework to focus specifically on continuing weight loss behaviors following an initial change. This framework focuses on transitioning from unhealthy behaviors to healthy behaviors through a 4-step process. The first step is an initial change, where for example, people with obesity begin an exercise program and healthy eating. This is followed by a sustained or continued response where people must overcome challenges and barriers to continuing the new exercise and diet behaviors. Ultimately, people move from the sustained response to a state of maintenance and then habit, where they have integrated the weight loss behaviors into their daily lives. However, for complex behaviors such as weight loss, the transition from continued response to maintenance is challenging [10,34,35]. People often relapse, revert back to their old behaviors and regain lost weight [4,5], particularly within the first month of a structured weight loss program [6].


Development of a Theoretically Driven mHealth Text Messaging Application for Sustaining Recent Weight Loss.

Shaw RJ, Bosworth HB, Hess JC, Silva SG, Lipkus IM, Davis LL, Johnson CM - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2013)

Rothman’s behavior change process [42].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114452&req=5

figure1: Rothman’s behavior change process [42].
Mentions: To develop an intervention to focus on sustaining weight loss following initiation and completion of a structure weight loss program, Rothman’s Behavior Change Process [42] (Figure 1) was used as a guiding framework to focus specifically on continuing weight loss behaviors following an initial change. This framework focuses on transitioning from unhealthy behaviors to healthy behaviors through a 4-step process. The first step is an initial change, where for example, people with obesity begin an exercise program and healthy eating. This is followed by a sustained or continued response where people must overcome challenges and barriers to continuing the new exercise and diet behaviors. Ultimately, people move from the sustained response to a state of maintenance and then habit, where they have integrated the weight loss behaviors into their daily lives. However, for complex behaviors such as weight loss, the transition from continued response to maintenance is challenging [10,34,35]. People often relapse, revert back to their old behaviors and regain lost weight [4,5], particularly within the first month of a structured weight loss program [6].

Bottom Line: Results were then used to develop the SMS text messaging application.Study results demonstrated the feasibility of developing weight loss SMS text messages, and the development of an mHealth SMS text messaging application.SMS text messaging was perceived as an appropriate and accepted tool to deliver health promotion content.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States. ryan.shaw@duke.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Mobile phone short message service (SMS) text messaging, has the potential to serve as an intervention medium to promote sustainability of weight loss that can be easily and affordably used by clinicians and consumers.

Objective: To develop theoretically driven weight loss sustaining text messages and pilot an mHealth SMS text messaging intervention to promote sustaining recent weight loss in order to understand optimal frequency and timing of message delivery, and for feasibility and usability testing. Results from the pilot study were used to design and construct a patient privacy compliant automated SMS application to deliver weight loss sustaining messages.

Methods: We first conducted a pilot study in which participants (N=16) received a daily SMS text message for one month following a structured weight loss program. Messages were developed from diet and exercise guidelines. Following the intervention, interviews were conducted and self-reported weight was collected via SMS text messaging.

Results: All participants (N=16) were capable of sending and receiving SMS text messages. During the phone interview at 1 month post-baseline and at 3 months post-baseline, 13/14 (93%) of participants who completed the study reported their weight via SMS. At 3 months post-baseline, 79% (11/14) participants sustained or continued to lose weight. Participants (13/14, 93%) were favorable toward the messages and the majority (10/14, 71%) felt they were useful in helping them sustain weight loss. All 14 participants who completed the interview thought SMS was a favorable communication medium and was useful to receive short relevant messages promptly and directly. All participants read the messages when they knew they arrived and most (11/14, 79%) read the messages at the time of delivery. All participants felt that at least one daily message is needed to sustain weight loss behaviors and that they should be delivered in the morning. Results were then used to develop the SMS text messaging application.

Conclusions: Study results demonstrated the feasibility of developing weight loss SMS text messages, and the development of an mHealth SMS text messaging application. SMS text messaging was perceived as an appropriate and accepted tool to deliver health promotion content.

No MeSH data available.