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Efficiency and usability of a near field communication-enabled tablet for medication administration.

Landman A, Neri PM, Robertson A, McEvoy D, Dinsmore M, Sweet M, Bane A, Takhar SS, Miles S - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Bottom Line: We compared the efficiency and usability of the prototype NFCMA system with the traditional BCMA system.Mean scan attempts with the NFCMA was 7.6 attempts compared with 6.5 attempts with the BCMA system (P=.12).The prototype NFCMA system was well received by nurses and offers promise to improve nurse medication administration efficiency.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston, MA, United States. alandman@partners.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Barcode-based technology coupled with the electronic medication administration record (e-MAR) reduces medication errors and potential adverse drug events (ADEs). However, many current barcode-enabled medication administration (BCMA) systems are difficult to maneuver and often require multiple barcode scans. We developed a prototype, next generation near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system using a tablet.

Objective: We compared the efficiency and usability of the prototype NFCMA system with the traditional BCMA system.

Methods: We used a mixed-methods design using a randomized observational cross-over study, a survey, and one-on-one interviews to compare the prototype NFCMA system with a traditional BCMA system. The study took place at an academic medical simulation center. Twenty nurses with BCMA experience participated in two simulated patient medication administration scenarios: one using the BCMA system, and the other using the prototype NFCMA system. We collected overall scenario completion time and number of medication scanning attempts per scenario, and compared those using paired t tests. We also collected participant feedback on the prototype NFCMA system using the modified International Business Machines (IBM) Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ) and a semistructured interview. We performed descriptive statistics on participant characteristics and responses to the IBM PSSUQ. Interview data was analyzed using content analysis with a qualitative description approach to review and categorize feedback from participants.

Results: Mean total time to complete the scenarios using the NFCMA and the BCMA systems was 202 seconds and 182 seconds, respectively (P=.09). Mean scan attempts with the NFCMA was 7.6 attempts compared with 6.5 attempts with the BCMA system (P=.12). In the usability survey, 95% (19/20) of participants agreed that the prototype NFCMA system was easy to use and easy to learn, with a pleasant interface. Participants expressed interest in using the NFCMA tablet in the hospital; suggestions focused on implementation issues, such as storage of the mobile devices and infection control methods.

Conclusions: The NFCMA system had similar efficiency to the BCMA system in a simulated scenario. The prototype NFCMA system was well received by nurses and offers promise to improve nurse medication administration efficiency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prototype near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system screenshot: pain scale dialog box.
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figure2: Prototype near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system screenshot: pain scale dialog box.

Mentions: The prototype NFCMA app was developed using the Android Software Development Kit. To ensure the study evaluated differences in mobile platform and NFC, the NFCMA software was designed to closely mimic existing barcode functionality; workflow and screens were similar to the current BCMA system. Differences were limited to the mobile footprint and the ability to identify the clinician, patient, and medication via NFC proximity touch. The mobile app also has the capability to confirm the five rights of medication administration and alert users with messages/warnings combined with sounds or vibration. Similar to the BCMA software, the NFCMA app prompted the user for additional information, including indication for “as needed” (PRN) orders, dose for variable dose medication orders, and pain level for pain medication orders. Importantly, the prototype NFCMA was developed as a standalone app; fictitious scenario data was hard coded into the app. The app did not capture real patient data or integrate with CPOE or other clinical information systems. Figures 1 and 2 show sample screenshots from the NFCMA app.


Efficiency and usability of a near field communication-enabled tablet for medication administration.

Landman A, Neri PM, Robertson A, McEvoy D, Dinsmore M, Sweet M, Bane A, Takhar SS, Miles S - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2014)

Prototype near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system screenshot: pain scale dialog box.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114445&req=5

figure2: Prototype near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system screenshot: pain scale dialog box.
Mentions: The prototype NFCMA app was developed using the Android Software Development Kit. To ensure the study evaluated differences in mobile platform and NFC, the NFCMA software was designed to closely mimic existing barcode functionality; workflow and screens were similar to the current BCMA system. Differences were limited to the mobile footprint and the ability to identify the clinician, patient, and medication via NFC proximity touch. The mobile app also has the capability to confirm the five rights of medication administration and alert users with messages/warnings combined with sounds or vibration. Similar to the BCMA software, the NFCMA app prompted the user for additional information, including indication for “as needed” (PRN) orders, dose for variable dose medication orders, and pain level for pain medication orders. Importantly, the prototype NFCMA was developed as a standalone app; fictitious scenario data was hard coded into the app. The app did not capture real patient data or integrate with CPOE or other clinical information systems. Figures 1 and 2 show sample screenshots from the NFCMA app.

Bottom Line: We compared the efficiency and usability of the prototype NFCMA system with the traditional BCMA system.Mean scan attempts with the NFCMA was 7.6 attempts compared with 6.5 attempts with the BCMA system (P=.12).The prototype NFCMA system was well received by nurses and offers promise to improve nurse medication administration efficiency.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston, MA, United States. alandman@partners.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Barcode-based technology coupled with the electronic medication administration record (e-MAR) reduces medication errors and potential adverse drug events (ADEs). However, many current barcode-enabled medication administration (BCMA) systems are difficult to maneuver and often require multiple barcode scans. We developed a prototype, next generation near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system using a tablet.

Objective: We compared the efficiency and usability of the prototype NFCMA system with the traditional BCMA system.

Methods: We used a mixed-methods design using a randomized observational cross-over study, a survey, and one-on-one interviews to compare the prototype NFCMA system with a traditional BCMA system. The study took place at an academic medical simulation center. Twenty nurses with BCMA experience participated in two simulated patient medication administration scenarios: one using the BCMA system, and the other using the prototype NFCMA system. We collected overall scenario completion time and number of medication scanning attempts per scenario, and compared those using paired t tests. We also collected participant feedback on the prototype NFCMA system using the modified International Business Machines (IBM) Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ) and a semistructured interview. We performed descriptive statistics on participant characteristics and responses to the IBM PSSUQ. Interview data was analyzed using content analysis with a qualitative description approach to review and categorize feedback from participants.

Results: Mean total time to complete the scenarios using the NFCMA and the BCMA systems was 202 seconds and 182 seconds, respectively (P=.09). Mean scan attempts with the NFCMA was 7.6 attempts compared with 6.5 attempts with the BCMA system (P=.12). In the usability survey, 95% (19/20) of participants agreed that the prototype NFCMA system was easy to use and easy to learn, with a pleasant interface. Participants expressed interest in using the NFCMA tablet in the hospital; suggestions focused on implementation issues, such as storage of the mobile devices and infection control methods.

Conclusions: The NFCMA system had similar efficiency to the BCMA system in a simulated scenario. The prototype NFCMA system was well received by nurses and offers promise to improve nurse medication administration efficiency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus