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Health-e-call, a smartphone-assisted behavioral obesity treatment: pilot study.

Thomas JG, Wing RR - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2013)

Bottom Line: Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University & The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, United States. jthomas4@lifespan.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individual and group-based behavioral weight loss treatment (BWL) produces average weight loss of 5-10% of initial body weight, which improves health and wellbeing. However, BWL is an intensive treatment that is costly and not widely available. Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate smartphones as a method of delivering key components of established and empirically validated behavioral weight loss treatment, with an emphasis on adherence to self-monitoring.

Methods: Twenty overweight/obese participants (95% women; 85% non-Hispanic White; mean age 53.0, SE 1.9) received 12-24 weeks of behavioral weight loss treatment consisting of smartphone-based self-monitoring, feedback, and behavioral skills training. Participants also received brief weekly weigh-ins and paper weight loss lessons.

Results: Average weight loss was 8.4kg (SE 0.8kg; 9%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 12 weeks and 10.9kg (SE 1.1kg; 11%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 24 weeks. Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.

Conclusions: Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

DailyBurn feedback on dietary intake.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure4: DailyBurn feedback on dietary intake.

Mentions: A combination of automated and human feedback was provided to participants via their smartphones. DailyBurn provided automatic feedback on the number of calories consumed relative to the participants’ daily goal each time food intake was recorded (Figure 4). Weight was entered daily and the application provided graphed feedback of participants’ weights relative to their weight loss goals. DailyBurn provided a visual tally of the number of days that participants met their calorie and physical activity goals each week. Brief messages from a study interventionist were sent to participants’ smartphones 1-3 times per week by text messaging. This feedback was based on participants’ self-monitoring data, which was available to the study team in real-time due to the smartphones’ uninterrupted Internet connection. This feedback was primarily supportive and sometimes included tips for modifying eating and/or physical activity behaviors. While participants were able to send a text message in response to the feedback, they were not allowed to engage in a dialogue with the interventionist via text messaging.


Health-e-call, a smartphone-assisted behavioral obesity treatment: pilot study.

Thomas JG, Wing RR - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2013)

DailyBurn feedback on dietary intake.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114436&req=5

figure4: DailyBurn feedback on dietary intake.
Mentions: A combination of automated and human feedback was provided to participants via their smartphones. DailyBurn provided automatic feedback on the number of calories consumed relative to the participants’ daily goal each time food intake was recorded (Figure 4). Weight was entered daily and the application provided graphed feedback of participants’ weights relative to their weight loss goals. DailyBurn provided a visual tally of the number of days that participants met their calorie and physical activity goals each week. Brief messages from a study interventionist were sent to participants’ smartphones 1-3 times per week by text messaging. This feedback was based on participants’ self-monitoring data, which was available to the study team in real-time due to the smartphones’ uninterrupted Internet connection. This feedback was primarily supportive and sometimes included tips for modifying eating and/or physical activity behaviors. While participants were able to send a text message in response to the feedback, they were not allowed to engage in a dialogue with the interventionist via text messaging.

Bottom Line: Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University & The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, United States. jthomas4@lifespan.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individual and group-based behavioral weight loss treatment (BWL) produces average weight loss of 5-10% of initial body weight, which improves health and wellbeing. However, BWL is an intensive treatment that is costly and not widely available. Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate smartphones as a method of delivering key components of established and empirically validated behavioral weight loss treatment, with an emphasis on adherence to self-monitoring.

Methods: Twenty overweight/obese participants (95% women; 85% non-Hispanic White; mean age 53.0, SE 1.9) received 12-24 weeks of behavioral weight loss treatment consisting of smartphone-based self-monitoring, feedback, and behavioral skills training. Participants also received brief weekly weigh-ins and paper weight loss lessons.

Results: Average weight loss was 8.4kg (SE 0.8kg; 9%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 12 weeks and 10.9kg (SE 1.1kg; 11%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 24 weeks. Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.

Conclusions: Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus