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Health-e-call, a smartphone-assisted behavioral obesity treatment: pilot study.

Thomas JG, Wing RR - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2013)

Bottom Line: Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University & The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, United States. jthomas4@lifespan.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individual and group-based behavioral weight loss treatment (BWL) produces average weight loss of 5-10% of initial body weight, which improves health and wellbeing. However, BWL is an intensive treatment that is costly and not widely available. Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate smartphones as a method of delivering key components of established and empirically validated behavioral weight loss treatment, with an emphasis on adherence to self-monitoring.

Methods: Twenty overweight/obese participants (95% women; 85% non-Hispanic White; mean age 53.0, SE 1.9) received 12-24 weeks of behavioral weight loss treatment consisting of smartphone-based self-monitoring, feedback, and behavioral skills training. Participants also received brief weekly weigh-ins and paper weight loss lessons.

Results: Average weight loss was 8.4kg (SE 0.8kg; 9%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 12 weeks and 10.9kg (SE 1.1kg; 11%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 24 weeks. Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.

Conclusions: Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Self-monitoring of food intake via the DailyBurn application.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure1: Self-monitoring of food intake via the DailyBurn application.

Mentions: The commercially available DailyBurn smartphone application was used for self-monitoring of daily food intake, physical activity, and body weight (Figure 1). Compared to traditional paper diaries, this program simplified self-monitoring by allowing participants to record their intake by searching for foods by name/description or by scanning barcodes on food packages. Participants were also able keep a list of favorite foods for faster entry. A simple touch interface allowed the participant to indicate the quantity of the foods consumed and the application maintained a real-time total of calories and fat grams consumed, as well as other characteristics of the diet. Similar procedures were used to record bouts of physical activity and daily body weight. The Health-E-Call team had no contact with DailyBurn prior to, or during the study. However, the intervention team was able access participants’ responses in real-time via a system developed by the first author to automate retrieval of data from DailyBurn using participants’ login credentials.


Health-e-call, a smartphone-assisted behavioral obesity treatment: pilot study.

Thomas JG, Wing RR - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2013)

Self-monitoring of food intake via the DailyBurn application.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4114436&req=5

figure1: Self-monitoring of food intake via the DailyBurn application.
Mentions: The commercially available DailyBurn smartphone application was used for self-monitoring of daily food intake, physical activity, and body weight (Figure 1). Compared to traditional paper diaries, this program simplified self-monitoring by allowing participants to record their intake by searching for foods by name/description or by scanning barcodes on food packages. Participants were also able keep a list of favorite foods for faster entry. A simple touch interface allowed the participant to indicate the quantity of the foods consumed and the application maintained a real-time total of calories and fat grams consumed, as well as other characteristics of the diet. Similar procedures were used to record bouts of physical activity and daily body weight. The Health-E-Call team had no contact with DailyBurn prior to, or during the study. However, the intervention team was able access participants’ responses in real-time via a system developed by the first author to automate retrieval of data from DailyBurn using participants’ login credentials.

Bottom Line: Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University & The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, United States. jthomas4@lifespan.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individual and group-based behavioral weight loss treatment (BWL) produces average weight loss of 5-10% of initial body weight, which improves health and wellbeing. However, BWL is an intensive treatment that is costly and not widely available. Smartphones may be a useful tool for promoting adherence to key aspects of BWL, such as self-monitoring, thereby facilitating weight loss while reducing the need for intensive in-person contact.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate smartphones as a method of delivering key components of established and empirically validated behavioral weight loss treatment, with an emphasis on adherence to self-monitoring.

Methods: Twenty overweight/obese participants (95% women; 85% non-Hispanic White; mean age 53.0, SE 1.9) received 12-24 weeks of behavioral weight loss treatment consisting of smartphone-based self-monitoring, feedback, and behavioral skills training. Participants also received brief weekly weigh-ins and paper weight loss lessons.

Results: Average weight loss was 8.4kg (SE 0.8kg; 9%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 12 weeks and 10.9kg (SE 1.1kg; 11%, SE 1% of initial body weight) at 24 weeks. Adherence to the self-monitoring protocol was 91% (SE 3%) during the first 12 weeks and 85% (SE 4%) during the second 12 weeks.

Conclusions: Smartphones show promise as a tool for delivering key components of BWL and may be particularly advantageous for optimizing adherence to self-monitoring, a cornerstone of BWL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus