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Leveraging two-way probe-level block design for identifying differential gene expression with high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

Barrera L, Benner C, Tao YC, Winzeler E, Zhou Y - BMC Bioinformatics (2004)

Bottom Line: We employ parametric and nonparametric variants of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on probe-level data to account for probe-level variation, and use the false-discovery rate (FDR) to account for simultaneous testing on thousands of genes (multiple testing problem).Using publicly available data sets, we systematically compared the performance of parametric two-way ANOVA and the nonparametric Mack-Skillings test to the t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for detecting differentially expressed genes at varying levels of fold change, concentration, and sample size.Our results suggest that the two-way ANOVA methods using probe-level data are substantially more powerful tests for detecting differential gene expression than corresponding methods for probe-set level data.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, California 92121, USA. lbarrera@bioinf.ucsd.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: To identify differentially expressed genes across experimental conditions in oligonucleotide microarray experiments, existing statistical methods commonly use a summary of probe-level expression data for each probe set and compare replicates of these values across conditions using a form of the t-test or rank sum test. Here we propose the use of a statistical method that takes advantage of the built-in redundancy architecture of high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

Results: We employ parametric and nonparametric variants of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on probe-level data to account for probe-level variation, and use the false-discovery rate (FDR) to account for simultaneous testing on thousands of genes (multiple testing problem). Using publicly available data sets, we systematically compared the performance of parametric two-way ANOVA and the nonparametric Mack-Skillings test to the t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for detecting differentially expressed genes at varying levels of fold change, concentration, and sample size. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve comparisons, we observed that two-way methods with FDR control on sample sizes with 2-3 replicates exhibits the same high sensitivity and specificity as a t-test with FDR control on sample sizes with 6-9 replicates in detecting at least two-fold change.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the two-way ANOVA methods using probe-level data are substantially more powerful tests for detecting differential gene expression than corresponding methods for probe-set level data.

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Comparison of the estimated expression values against the known spiked transcript concentrations.
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Figure 4: Comparison of the estimated expression values against the known spiked transcript concentrations.

Mentions: The decrease in sensitivity at higher concentrations over the lower fold changes for all methods prompted an investigation of the associated expression values used. A log-log plot of the average difference values against the known concentrations of the spiked transcripts (Fig. 4) suggests a nonlinear relationship between measured intensities and the spiked concentrations at the higher concentrations supporting the lack of sensitivity of all tests in that range. The nonlinear relationship at the low concentration range is mainly caused by hybridization noise. Despite low signal-noise ratio in this range, the two-way methods can consistently detect two-fold changes for a gene concentration as low as 4 pM whereas the SAM-like one-way methods were generally unsuccessful for the range of concentrations at this fold change for the data set (Fig. 3).


Leveraging two-way probe-level block design for identifying differential gene expression with high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

Barrera L, Benner C, Tao YC, Winzeler E, Zhou Y - BMC Bioinformatics (2004)

Comparison of the estimated expression values against the known spiked transcript concentrations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC411067&req=5

Figure 4: Comparison of the estimated expression values against the known spiked transcript concentrations.
Mentions: The decrease in sensitivity at higher concentrations over the lower fold changes for all methods prompted an investigation of the associated expression values used. A log-log plot of the average difference values against the known concentrations of the spiked transcripts (Fig. 4) suggests a nonlinear relationship between measured intensities and the spiked concentrations at the higher concentrations supporting the lack of sensitivity of all tests in that range. The nonlinear relationship at the low concentration range is mainly caused by hybridization noise. Despite low signal-noise ratio in this range, the two-way methods can consistently detect two-fold changes for a gene concentration as low as 4 pM whereas the SAM-like one-way methods were generally unsuccessful for the range of concentrations at this fold change for the data set (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: We employ parametric and nonparametric variants of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on probe-level data to account for probe-level variation, and use the false-discovery rate (FDR) to account for simultaneous testing on thousands of genes (multiple testing problem).Using publicly available data sets, we systematically compared the performance of parametric two-way ANOVA and the nonparametric Mack-Skillings test to the t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for detecting differentially expressed genes at varying levels of fold change, concentration, and sample size.Our results suggest that the two-way ANOVA methods using probe-level data are substantially more powerful tests for detecting differential gene expression than corresponding methods for probe-set level data.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, California 92121, USA. lbarrera@bioinf.ucsd.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: To identify differentially expressed genes across experimental conditions in oligonucleotide microarray experiments, existing statistical methods commonly use a summary of probe-level expression data for each probe set and compare replicates of these values across conditions using a form of the t-test or rank sum test. Here we propose the use of a statistical method that takes advantage of the built-in redundancy architecture of high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

Results: We employ parametric and nonparametric variants of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on probe-level data to account for probe-level variation, and use the false-discovery rate (FDR) to account for simultaneous testing on thousands of genes (multiple testing problem). Using publicly available data sets, we systematically compared the performance of parametric two-way ANOVA and the nonparametric Mack-Skillings test to the t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for detecting differentially expressed genes at varying levels of fold change, concentration, and sample size. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve comparisons, we observed that two-way methods with FDR control on sample sizes with 2-3 replicates exhibits the same high sensitivity and specificity as a t-test with FDR control on sample sizes with 6-9 replicates in detecting at least two-fold change.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the two-way ANOVA methods using probe-level data are substantially more powerful tests for detecting differential gene expression than corresponding methods for probe-set level data.

Show MeSH