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Squamous cell carcinoma developing in the scar of Fournier's gangrene--case report.

- BMC Cancer (2004)

Bottom Line: A 65-year-old gentleman presented with a small non-healing ulcer developing on right hemi-scrotum two years after the treatment for Fournier's gangrene.On histological examination it was found to be squamous cell carcinoma.Squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the scar of Fournier's gangrene after a long delay, which differentiates it from other scar carcinomas or Marjolin's ulcer.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of surgery, Indian Council of Medical Research, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi 110023, India. chintamani7@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Squamous cell carcinoma of the scrotum is rare and its development in the scar of Fournier's gangrene is still rarer.

Case presentation: A 65-year-old gentleman presented with a small non-healing ulcer developing on right hemi-scrotum two years after the treatment for Fournier's gangrene. On histological examination it was found to be squamous cell carcinoma. He was successfully managed by surgery in the form of wide local excision and ilio-inguinal lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Conclusions: Squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the scar of Fournier's gangrene after a long delay, which differentiates it from other scar carcinomas or Marjolin's ulcer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrograph showing poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a high mitotic index and densely staining anaplastic cells
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Figure 4: Photomicrograph showing poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a high mitotic index and densely staining anaplastic cells

Mentions: The histopathological examination of the resected specimen was suggestive of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the scrotum with marked nuclear atypia throughout and little evidence of keratinisation particularly in the deeper portions. The cells were rounded, polyhedral and had eosinophillic or clear cytoplasm (Fig. 4). The resected margins were microscopically free from the tumour (R0 resection). Six out of twelve inguinal lymph nodes removed showed metastases.


Squamous cell carcinoma developing in the scar of Fournier's gangrene--case report.

- BMC Cancer (2004)

Photomicrograph showing poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a high mitotic index and densely staining anaplastic cells
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC411041&req=5

Figure 4: Photomicrograph showing poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with a high mitotic index and densely staining anaplastic cells
Mentions: The histopathological examination of the resected specimen was suggestive of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the scrotum with marked nuclear atypia throughout and little evidence of keratinisation particularly in the deeper portions. The cells were rounded, polyhedral and had eosinophillic or clear cytoplasm (Fig. 4). The resected margins were microscopically free from the tumour (R0 resection). Six out of twelve inguinal lymph nodes removed showed metastases.

Bottom Line: A 65-year-old gentleman presented with a small non-healing ulcer developing on right hemi-scrotum two years after the treatment for Fournier's gangrene.On histological examination it was found to be squamous cell carcinoma.Squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the scar of Fournier's gangrene after a long delay, which differentiates it from other scar carcinomas or Marjolin's ulcer.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of surgery, Indian Council of Medical Research, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi 110023, India. chintamani7@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Squamous cell carcinoma of the scrotum is rare and its development in the scar of Fournier's gangrene is still rarer.

Case presentation: A 65-year-old gentleman presented with a small non-healing ulcer developing on right hemi-scrotum two years after the treatment for Fournier's gangrene. On histological examination it was found to be squamous cell carcinoma. He was successfully managed by surgery in the form of wide local excision and ilio-inguinal lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Conclusions: Squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the scar of Fournier's gangrene after a long delay, which differentiates it from other scar carcinomas or Marjolin's ulcer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus