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Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles.

Kafshgari MH, Cavallaro A, Delalat B, Harding FJ, McInnes SJ, Mäkilä E, Salonen J, Vasilev K, Voelcker NH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells.The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties.These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471 Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

No MeSH data available.


SEM images and EDX spectra of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E.coli. (a) SEM image of NO/THCPSi NP-treatedE. coli, (b) SEM image of the E. coli only,(c) EDX spectrum of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E. coli,and (d) EDX spectrum of untreated E. coli as a control.EDX analysis performed on bacterial surface (yellow overlay). NPs on thebacterial surface and settled on the background are indicated by redarrows.
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Figure 5: SEM images and EDX spectra of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E.coli. (a) SEM image of NO/THCPSi NP-treatedE. coli, (b) SEM image of the E. coli only,(c) EDX spectrum of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E. coli,and (d) EDX spectrum of untreated E. coli as a control.EDX analysis performed on bacterial surface (yellow overlay). NPs on thebacterial surface and settled on the background are indicated by redarrows.

Mentions: Figure 5 shows the SEM images and EDX spectra ofE. coli treated with NO/THCPSi NPs compared with an untreatedcontrol. Single NPs and NP aggregates were evident in the SEM images on thebacteria and on the background surface. The presence of the NO/THCPSi NPs on thesurface of the cell membrane of the E. coli was confirmed by the EDXresults, which showed a peak characteristic for Si (Figure 5c).


Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles.

Kafshgari MH, Cavallaro A, Delalat B, Harding FJ, McInnes SJ, Mäkilä E, Salonen J, Vasilev K, Voelcker NH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

SEM images and EDX spectra of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E.coli. (a) SEM image of NO/THCPSi NP-treatedE. coli, (b) SEM image of the E. coli only,(c) EDX spectrum of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E. coli,and (d) EDX spectrum of untreated E. coli as a control.EDX analysis performed on bacterial surface (yellow overlay). NPs on thebacterial surface and settled on the background are indicated by redarrows.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109794&req=5

Figure 5: SEM images and EDX spectra of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E.coli. (a) SEM image of NO/THCPSi NP-treatedE. coli, (b) SEM image of the E. coli only,(c) EDX spectrum of NO/THCPSi NP-treated E. coli,and (d) EDX spectrum of untreated E. coli as a control.EDX analysis performed on bacterial surface (yellow overlay). NPs on thebacterial surface and settled on the background are indicated by redarrows.
Mentions: Figure 5 shows the SEM images and EDX spectra ofE. coli treated with NO/THCPSi NPs compared with an untreatedcontrol. Single NPs and NP aggregates were evident in the SEM images on thebacteria and on the background surface. The presence of the NO/THCPSi NPs on thesurface of the cell membrane of the E. coli was confirmed by the EDXresults, which showed a peak characteristic for Si (Figure 5c).

Bottom Line: Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells.The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties.These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471 Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

No MeSH data available.