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Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles.

Kafshgari MH, Cavallaro A, Delalat B, Harding FJ, McInnes SJ, Mäkilä E, Salonen J, Vasilev K, Voelcker NH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells.The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties.These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471 Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

No MeSH data available.


NO release from NO/THCPSi NPs as a function of time. NO/THCPSi NPsprepared using the heating protocol (black cross-lines) and thelyophilization protocol (red empty triangles).n = 3; mean ± standard deviationshown.
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Figure 2: NO release from NO/THCPSi NPs as a function of time. NO/THCPSi NPsprepared using the heating protocol (black cross-lines) and thelyophilization protocol (red empty triangles).n = 3; mean ± standard deviationshown.

Mentions: The cumulative release of NO from NO/THCPSi NPs was assessed in PBS (pH 7.4)at 37°C by monitoring conversion of DAF-FM to fluorescein via fluorimetry.DAF-FM conversion requires NO and does not occur in the presence of otherreactive oxygen/nitrogen species. The results are shown in Figure 2. NO/THCPSi NPs prepared by both heating and lyophilizationprotocols were tested. Release of NO from NO/THCPSi NPs occurred predominatelyin the first 2 h of the monitoring period. Although NPs created by eithermethods displayed the same maximal release of NO into the PBS medium after 2-hincubation, release profiles obtained using NPs prepared using thelyophilization protocol showed an initial burst release phase (within the first30 min). In contrast, glucose/THCPSi NPs, sodium nitrite/THCPSi NPs, PBS,and sodium nitrite solution controls showed no NO release (Additional file1: Figure S2), demonstrating that the NO releaseindeed only occurs upon nitrite reduction. In reports describing otherNO-releasing mesoporous nanocarriers [9,23], only a short period of continuous release is noted, suggesting thatthe NO/THCPSi NPs described here possess a higher capacity for sustained releaseof NO.


Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles.

Kafshgari MH, Cavallaro A, Delalat B, Harding FJ, McInnes SJ, Mäkilä E, Salonen J, Vasilev K, Voelcker NH - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

NO release from NO/THCPSi NPs as a function of time. NO/THCPSi NPsprepared using the heating protocol (black cross-lines) and thelyophilization protocol (red empty triangles).n = 3; mean ± standard deviationshown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109794&req=5

Figure 2: NO release from NO/THCPSi NPs as a function of time. NO/THCPSi NPsprepared using the heating protocol (black cross-lines) and thelyophilization protocol (red empty triangles).n = 3; mean ± standard deviationshown.
Mentions: The cumulative release of NO from NO/THCPSi NPs was assessed in PBS (pH 7.4)at 37°C by monitoring conversion of DAF-FM to fluorescein via fluorimetry.DAF-FM conversion requires NO and does not occur in the presence of otherreactive oxygen/nitrogen species. The results are shown in Figure 2. NO/THCPSi NPs prepared by both heating and lyophilizationprotocols were tested. Release of NO from NO/THCPSi NPs occurred predominatelyin the first 2 h of the monitoring period. Although NPs created by eithermethods displayed the same maximal release of NO into the PBS medium after 2-hincubation, release profiles obtained using NPs prepared using thelyophilization protocol showed an initial burst release phase (within the first30 min). In contrast, glucose/THCPSi NPs, sodium nitrite/THCPSi NPs, PBS,and sodium nitrite solution controls showed no NO release (Additional file1: Figure S2), demonstrating that the NO releaseindeed only occurs upon nitrite reduction. In reports describing otherNO-releasing mesoporous nanocarriers [9,23], only a short period of continuous release is noted, suggesting thatthe NO/THCPSi NPs described here possess a higher capacity for sustained releaseof NO.

Bottom Line: Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells.The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties.These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471 Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.

ABSTRACT
In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

No MeSH data available.