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Short-term glutamine supplementation decreases lung inflammation and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products expression in direct acute lung injury in mice.

Chuang YC, Shaw HM, Chen CC, Pan HJ, Lai WC, Huang HL - BMC Pulm Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The results of this study showed that ALI-challenged mice had a significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity and expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the lung compared with unchallenged mice.The GLN group also had markedly lower in mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and NADPH oxidase-1.These results suggest that the benefit of dietary GLN may be partly contributed to an inhibitory effect on RAGE expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines production at an early stage in direct acid and LPS-induced ALI in mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Nutrition, Chia-Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan. cherry85@mail.chna.edu.tw.

ABSTRACT

Background: Glutamine (GLN) has been reported to improve clinical and experimental sepsis outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of GLN remain unclear, and may depend upon the route of GLN administration and the model of acute lung injury (ALI) used. The aim of this study was to investigate whether short-term GLN supplementation had an ameliorative effect on the inflammation induced by direct acid and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in mice.

Methods: Female BALB/c mice were divided into two groups, a control group and a GLN group (4.17% GLN supplementation). After a 10-day feeding period, ALI was induced by intratracheal administration of hydrochloric acid (pH 1.0; 2 mL/kg of body weight [BW]) and LPS (5 mg/kg BW). Mice were sacrificed 3 h after ALI challenge. In this early phase of ALI, serum, lungs, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from the mice were collected for further analysis.

Results: The results of this study showed that ALI-challenged mice had a significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity and expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the lung compared with unchallenged mice. Compared with the control group, GLN pretreatment in ALI-challenged mice reduced the levels of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and IL-1β production in BALF, with a corresponding decrease in their mRNA expression. The GLN group also had markedly lower in mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and NADPH oxidase-1.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the benefit of dietary GLN may be partly contributed to an inhibitory effect on RAGE expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines production at an early stage in direct acid and LPS-induced ALI in mice.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

RAGE concentrations in the BALF of ALI-challenged mice. (A) RAGE; (B) IL-1β; (C) IL-6; (D) TNF-α. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation; n = 10–12. The effect of GLN was evaluated by Student’s t-test in two ALI-induced groups (*p < 0.05 vs. the control group).
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Figure 2: RAGE concentrations in the BALF of ALI-challenged mice. (A) RAGE; (B) IL-1β; (C) IL-6; (D) TNF-α. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation; n = 10–12. The effect of GLN was evaluated by Student’s t-test in two ALI-induced groups (*p < 0.05 vs. the control group).

Mentions: To examine the anti-inflammatory effect of GLN in ALI-challenged mice, we measured serum cytokine concentrations and used BALF for further analysis. Figure 1 shows that serum TNF-α concentrations did not differ between the control and GLN groups in ALI-challenged mice. In the GLN group, a marked reduction in IL-6 (37%) was observed. As shown in Figure 2, BALF RAGE and IL-1β levels were significantly lower in the GLN group than in the control group of ALI-challenged mice. There were no significant differences in IL-6 and TNF-α levels between the control and GLN groups.


Short-term glutamine supplementation decreases lung inflammation and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products expression in direct acute lung injury in mice.

Chuang YC, Shaw HM, Chen CC, Pan HJ, Lai WC, Huang HL - BMC Pulm Med (2014)

RAGE concentrations in the BALF of ALI-challenged mice. (A) RAGE; (B) IL-1β; (C) IL-6; (D) TNF-α. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation; n = 10–12. The effect of GLN was evaluated by Student’s t-test in two ALI-induced groups (*p < 0.05 vs. the control group).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109782&req=5

Figure 2: RAGE concentrations in the BALF of ALI-challenged mice. (A) RAGE; (B) IL-1β; (C) IL-6; (D) TNF-α. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation; n = 10–12. The effect of GLN was evaluated by Student’s t-test in two ALI-induced groups (*p < 0.05 vs. the control group).
Mentions: To examine the anti-inflammatory effect of GLN in ALI-challenged mice, we measured serum cytokine concentrations and used BALF for further analysis. Figure 1 shows that serum TNF-α concentrations did not differ between the control and GLN groups in ALI-challenged mice. In the GLN group, a marked reduction in IL-6 (37%) was observed. As shown in Figure 2, BALF RAGE and IL-1β levels were significantly lower in the GLN group than in the control group of ALI-challenged mice. There were no significant differences in IL-6 and TNF-α levels between the control and GLN groups.

Bottom Line: The results of this study showed that ALI-challenged mice had a significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity and expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the lung compared with unchallenged mice.The GLN group also had markedly lower in mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and NADPH oxidase-1.These results suggest that the benefit of dietary GLN may be partly contributed to an inhibitory effect on RAGE expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines production at an early stage in direct acid and LPS-induced ALI in mice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Nutrition, Chia-Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan. cherry85@mail.chna.edu.tw.

ABSTRACT

Background: Glutamine (GLN) has been reported to improve clinical and experimental sepsis outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of GLN remain unclear, and may depend upon the route of GLN administration and the model of acute lung injury (ALI) used. The aim of this study was to investigate whether short-term GLN supplementation had an ameliorative effect on the inflammation induced by direct acid and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in mice.

Methods: Female BALB/c mice were divided into two groups, a control group and a GLN group (4.17% GLN supplementation). After a 10-day feeding period, ALI was induced by intratracheal administration of hydrochloric acid (pH 1.0; 2 mL/kg of body weight [BW]) and LPS (5 mg/kg BW). Mice were sacrificed 3 h after ALI challenge. In this early phase of ALI, serum, lungs, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from the mice were collected for further analysis.

Results: The results of this study showed that ALI-challenged mice had a significant increase in myeloperoxidase activity and expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the lung compared with unchallenged mice. Compared with the control group, GLN pretreatment in ALI-challenged mice reduced the levels of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and IL-1β production in BALF, with a corresponding decrease in their mRNA expression. The GLN group also had markedly lower in mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and NADPH oxidase-1.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the benefit of dietary GLN may be partly contributed to an inhibitory effect on RAGE expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines production at an early stage in direct acid and LPS-induced ALI in mice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus