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High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study.

Tagliafico A, Cadoni A, Bignotti B, Martinoli C - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05).No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71).In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department -DISSAL- Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, 16138 Genova, Italy. bignottibianca@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US).

Methods: From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded.

Results: Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71).

Conclusion: In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of coracohumeral thickness measurement. Note the tendon of the long head of the biceps below the calipers.
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Figure 1: Example of coracohumeral thickness measurement. Note the tendon of the long head of the biceps below the calipers.

Mentions: From August 2009 to September 2010 both shoulder of n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3 years) were evaluated bilaterally by mean of high-resolution ultrasound using a 17–5 MHz broadband linear array transducer (iU22, Philips Medical System, the Netherlands). Ultrasonographic evaluation included complete shoulder assessment with a standardized protocol suggested by the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology [9] and coracohumaral thickness measurement (Figure 1) as described in literature [19]. All players included in the study had no history of trauma or treatment involving either shoulder. No player had a history of systemic inflammatory disease.


High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study.

Tagliafico A, Cadoni A, Bignotti B, Martinoli C - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2014)

Example of coracohumeral thickness measurement. Note the tendon of the long head of the biceps below the calipers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109776&req=5

Figure 1: Example of coracohumeral thickness measurement. Note the tendon of the long head of the biceps below the calipers.
Mentions: From August 2009 to September 2010 both shoulder of n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3 years) were evaluated bilaterally by mean of high-resolution ultrasound using a 17–5 MHz broadband linear array transducer (iU22, Philips Medical System, the Netherlands). Ultrasonographic evaluation included complete shoulder assessment with a standardized protocol suggested by the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology [9] and coracohumaral thickness measurement (Figure 1) as described in literature [19]. All players included in the study had no history of trauma or treatment involving either shoulder. No player had a history of systemic inflammatory disease.

Bottom Line: CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05).No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71).In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department -DISSAL- Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, 16138 Genova, Italy. bignottibianca@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US).

Methods: From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded.

Results: Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71).

Conclusion: In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus