Limits...
In vitro and in vivo characterization of the new analgesic combination Beta-caryophyllene and docosahexaenoic Acid.

Fiorenzani P, Lamponi S, Magnani A, Ceccarelli I, Aloisi AM - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: BCP changed fibroblast and astrocyte survival in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was counteracted by DHA coadministration.In the in vivo tests, pain responses were significantly decreased in the BCP and BCP+DHA groups with respect to OIL after 1 and 2 weeks of treatment.In conclusion, BCP alone or at lower concentration in combination with DHA was efficacious in modulating pain, showing a clear analgesic activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Via Aldo Moro, 53100 Siena, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are components of several plants with documented anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in animal pain models. In the present study, in vitro and in vivo tests were carried out to evaluate their effects, alone or in combination, during long-lasting administration in a model of persistent pain. IR spectra of the two compounds were obtained to determine their chemical stability and then in vitro toxicity was evaluated in fibroblasts and astrocytes. In the in vivo tests, the analgesic effects of BCP and BCP+DHA were determined in male rats subjected to a model of persistent recurrent pain (three repetitions of the formalin test once a week) to mimic recurrent pain. Both substances were administered per os in almond oil for 2 weeks. Gonadal hormones were determined at the end of the tests to evaluate treatment-induced effects on their levels. BCP changed fibroblast and astrocyte survival in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was counteracted by DHA coadministration. In the in vivo tests, pain responses were significantly decreased in the BCP and BCP+DHA groups with respect to OIL after 1 and 2 weeks of treatment. Estradiol and testosterone levels were increased only in the BCP group. In conclusion, BCP alone or at lower concentration in combination with DHA was efficacious in modulating pain, showing a clear analgesic activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Failure of timely resolution of inflammation drives chronic inflammatory conditions and pain. Resolution of inflammation requires the elimination of key inflammatory cells and the downregulation of proinflammatory mediators at the inflamed sites. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is converted into resolvins and protectins that counteract excessive inflammatory responses and stimulate proresolving mechanisms, tissue repair, and decreased pain. Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) reduces inflammation by its action on CB2 receptors, which are mostly expressed on immune cells and microglia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109702&req=5

fig10: Failure of timely resolution of inflammation drives chronic inflammatory conditions and pain. Resolution of inflammation requires the elimination of key inflammatory cells and the downregulation of proinflammatory mediators at the inflamed sites. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is converted into resolvins and protectins that counteract excessive inflammatory responses and stimulate proresolving mechanisms, tissue repair, and decreased pain. Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) reduces inflammation by its action on CB2 receptors, which are mostly expressed on immune cells and microglia.

Mentions: In conclusion, the results of our experiment confirm the potent analgesic role of these compounds and their synergistic action and suggest their possible use in long-lasting treatments (Figure 10).


In vitro and in vivo characterization of the new analgesic combination Beta-caryophyllene and docosahexaenoic Acid.

Fiorenzani P, Lamponi S, Magnani A, Ceccarelli I, Aloisi AM - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Failure of timely resolution of inflammation drives chronic inflammatory conditions and pain. Resolution of inflammation requires the elimination of key inflammatory cells and the downregulation of proinflammatory mediators at the inflamed sites. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is converted into resolvins and protectins that counteract excessive inflammatory responses and stimulate proresolving mechanisms, tissue repair, and decreased pain. Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) reduces inflammation by its action on CB2 receptors, which are mostly expressed on immune cells and microglia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109702&req=5

fig10: Failure of timely resolution of inflammation drives chronic inflammatory conditions and pain. Resolution of inflammation requires the elimination of key inflammatory cells and the downregulation of proinflammatory mediators at the inflamed sites. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is converted into resolvins and protectins that counteract excessive inflammatory responses and stimulate proresolving mechanisms, tissue repair, and decreased pain. Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) reduces inflammation by its action on CB2 receptors, which are mostly expressed on immune cells and microglia.
Mentions: In conclusion, the results of our experiment confirm the potent analgesic role of these compounds and their synergistic action and suggest their possible use in long-lasting treatments (Figure 10).

Bottom Line: BCP changed fibroblast and astrocyte survival in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was counteracted by DHA coadministration.In the in vivo tests, pain responses were significantly decreased in the BCP and BCP+DHA groups with respect to OIL after 1 and 2 weeks of treatment.In conclusion, BCP alone or at lower concentration in combination with DHA was efficacious in modulating pain, showing a clear analgesic activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Via Aldo Moro, 53100 Siena, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are components of several plants with documented anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in animal pain models. In the present study, in vitro and in vivo tests were carried out to evaluate their effects, alone or in combination, during long-lasting administration in a model of persistent pain. IR spectra of the two compounds were obtained to determine their chemical stability and then in vitro toxicity was evaluated in fibroblasts and astrocytes. In the in vivo tests, the analgesic effects of BCP and BCP+DHA were determined in male rats subjected to a model of persistent recurrent pain (three repetitions of the formalin test once a week) to mimic recurrent pain. Both substances were administered per os in almond oil for 2 weeks. Gonadal hormones were determined at the end of the tests to evaluate treatment-induced effects on their levels. BCP changed fibroblast and astrocyte survival in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was counteracted by DHA coadministration. In the in vivo tests, pain responses were significantly decreased in the BCP and BCP+DHA groups with respect to OIL after 1 and 2 weeks of treatment. Estradiol and testosterone levels were increased only in the BCP group. In conclusion, BCP alone or at lower concentration in combination with DHA was efficacious in modulating pain, showing a clear analgesic activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus