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The 'Dangerous' Women of Animal Welfare: How British Veterinary Medicine Went to the Dogs.

Gardiner A - Soc Hist Med (2014)

Bottom Line: This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century.The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period.This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century. The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period. The success of this unqualified practice caused the veterinary profession to rethink attitudes to small animals (dogs initially, later cats) upon the decline of horse practice. This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Part of the fleet of PDSA ambulances that scoured the countryside for patients, according the practice sales agent, Charles Huish (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)
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HKT101F3: Part of the fleet of PDSA ambulances that scoured the countryside for patients, according the practice sales agent, Charles Huish (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)

Mentions: In 1930, the main valuer and selling agent for veterinary practices, Charles H. Huish, wrote to Henry Gray, the small animal specialist in Earls Court:


The 'Dangerous' Women of Animal Welfare: How British Veterinary Medicine Went to the Dogs.

Gardiner A - Soc Hist Med (2014)

Part of the fleet of PDSA ambulances that scoured the countryside for patients, according the practice sales agent, Charles Huish (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109695&req=5

HKT101F3: Part of the fleet of PDSA ambulances that scoured the countryside for patients, according the practice sales agent, Charles Huish (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)
Mentions: In 1930, the main valuer and selling agent for veterinary practices, Charles H. Huish, wrote to Henry Gray, the small animal specialist in Earls Court:

Bottom Line: This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century.The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period.This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century. The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period. The success of this unqualified practice caused the veterinary profession to rethink attitudes to small animals (dogs initially, later cats) upon the decline of horse practice. This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus