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The 'Dangerous' Women of Animal Welfare: How British Veterinary Medicine Went to the Dogs.

Gardiner A - Soc Hist Med (2014)

Bottom Line: This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century.The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period.This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century. The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period. The success of this unqualified practice caused the veterinary profession to rethink attitudes to small animals (dogs initially, later cats) upon the decline of horse practice. This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trainee technical officers at the PDSA Sanatorium. This type of ‘hospital medicine’ was not seen within British veterinary practice at this time (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)
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HKT101F2: Trainee technical officers at the PDSA Sanatorium. This type of ‘hospital medicine’ was not seen within British veterinary practice at this time (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)

Mentions: The Sanatorium fulfilled an important teaching role and junior technical assistants from outlying dispensaries attended for classes. Training took three to five years in total and involved theoretical spells at the Sanatorium in between practical work in the dispensaries in the regions. This block-release format probably provided more ‘hands-on’ training than any of Britain's veterinary colleges, with extensive clinical exposure from the outset.Fig. 2


The 'Dangerous' Women of Animal Welfare: How British Veterinary Medicine Went to the Dogs.

Gardiner A - Soc Hist Med (2014)

Trainee technical officers at the PDSA Sanatorium. This type of ‘hospital medicine’ was not seen within British veterinary practice at this time (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109695&req=5

HKT101F2: Trainee technical officers at the PDSA Sanatorium. This type of ‘hospital medicine’ was not seen within British veterinary practice at this time (copyright PDSA, reproduced with permission)
Mentions: The Sanatorium fulfilled an important teaching role and junior technical assistants from outlying dispensaries attended for classes. Training took three to five years in total and involved theoretical spells at the Sanatorium in between practical work in the dispensaries in the regions. This block-release format probably provided more ‘hands-on’ training than any of Britain's veterinary colleges, with extensive clinical exposure from the outset.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century.The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period.This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the turn toward the small companion animal that occurred in British veterinary medicine in the twentieth century. The change in species emphasis is usually attributed to post-war socioeconomic factors, however this explanation ignores the extensive small animal treatment that was occurring outwith the veterinary profession in the interwar period. The success of this unqualified practice caused the veterinary profession to rethink attitudes to small animals (dogs initially, later cats) upon the decline of horse practice. This paper argues that a shift toward seeing the small animal as a legitimate veterinary patient was necessary before the specialty could become mainstream in the post-war years, and that this occurred between the wars as a result of the activities of British animal welfare charities, especially the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals of the Poor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus