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Sliding and lower limb mechanics during sit-stand-sit transitions with a standing wheelchair.

Yang YS, Chen MD, Fang WC, Chang JJ, Kuo CC - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight.A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions.Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the shear displacement between the body and backrest/seat, range of motion (ROM), and force acting on the lower limb joints during sit-stand-sit transitions by operating an electric-powered standing wheelchair.

Methods and materials: The amounts of sliding along the backrest and the seat plane, ROM of lower limb joints, and force acting on the knee/foot were measured in twenty-four people with paraplegia.

Results: Without an antishear mechanism, the shear displacement was approximately 9 cm between the user's body and the backrest/seat surfaces. During standing up, the user's back slid down and the thigh was displaced rearward, but they moved in opposite directions when wheelchair sat back down. A minimum of 60 degrees of ROM at the hip and knee was needed during sit-stand-sit transitions. The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight.

Conclusion: Sliding between the body and backrest/seat occurred while transitioning from sitting to standing and vice versa. A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions. Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative plot (subject number 10) of lower extremity joint angle motion as the seat-back angle of the standing wheelchair transformed from sit-to-stand and vice versa.
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fig3: Representative plot (subject number 10) of lower extremity joint angle motion as the seat-back angle of the standing wheelchair transformed from sit-to-stand and vice versa.

Mentions: There are no significant differences in the ROM of hip, knee, and ankle joint when comparing sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions (Table 1). The average ROM of hip and knee joint was 62.1 and 60.8 degrees, respectively, but much less ROM of ankle joint (2~3 degrees) was found. During sit-to-stand transition, the hip and knee joint angle increased in accordance with an increase in the seat-to-back angle. Moreover, the knee angle still increased despite the fact that the backrest was reclined to a flat position (Figure 3). On the contrary, the hip and knee joint angle both decreased with decreasing seat-to-back angle during a stand-to-sit transition (Figure 2). No significant changes in ankle ROM were detected during sit-to-stand-to-sit transition.


Sliding and lower limb mechanics during sit-stand-sit transitions with a standing wheelchair.

Yang YS, Chen MD, Fang WC, Chang JJ, Kuo CC - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Representative plot (subject number 10) of lower extremity joint angle motion as the seat-back angle of the standing wheelchair transformed from sit-to-stand and vice versa.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4109664&req=5

fig3: Representative plot (subject number 10) of lower extremity joint angle motion as the seat-back angle of the standing wheelchair transformed from sit-to-stand and vice versa.
Mentions: There are no significant differences in the ROM of hip, knee, and ankle joint when comparing sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions (Table 1). The average ROM of hip and knee joint was 62.1 and 60.8 degrees, respectively, but much less ROM of ankle joint (2~3 degrees) was found. During sit-to-stand transition, the hip and knee joint angle increased in accordance with an increase in the seat-to-back angle. Moreover, the knee angle still increased despite the fact that the backrest was reclined to a flat position (Figure 3). On the contrary, the hip and knee joint angle both decreased with decreasing seat-to-back angle during a stand-to-sit transition (Figure 2). No significant changes in ankle ROM were detected during sit-to-stand-to-sit transition.

Bottom Line: The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight.A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions.Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the shear displacement between the body and backrest/seat, range of motion (ROM), and force acting on the lower limb joints during sit-stand-sit transitions by operating an electric-powered standing wheelchair.

Methods and materials: The amounts of sliding along the backrest and the seat plane, ROM of lower limb joints, and force acting on the knee/foot were measured in twenty-four people with paraplegia.

Results: Without an antishear mechanism, the shear displacement was approximately 9 cm between the user's body and the backrest/seat surfaces. During standing up, the user's back slid down and the thigh was displaced rearward, but they moved in opposite directions when wheelchair sat back down. A minimum of 60 degrees of ROM at the hip and knee was needed during sit-stand-sit transitions. The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight.

Conclusion: Sliding between the body and backrest/seat occurred while transitioning from sitting to standing and vice versa. A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions. Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus